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RE: New Feathered Dinosaur



> Not necessarily.  Depends on indicated airspeed,  altitude
> (temperature), and
> method of energy production.  Some of the larger pterosaurs would not need
> insulation, and would not even need to be endothermic.  I'm not
> saying that
> they wouldn't be or weren't, only that the necessities of soaring flight
> wouldn't necessarily require it.

Hmmm, to extrapolate then......

"Some of the larger pterosaurs would ........... not even need to be
endothermic."

Given that air cools as it rises (by what, 1*C per 100 vertical metres?),
and wind chill (no figures) has a significant affect, is it a logical
conclusion that larger (uninsulated and non-endothermic) were obliged to
keep low and fly slow?

cheers, m
>
> Jim
>
> P.S.  Did I use enough variants of the word 'necessary' ?  :-)
>
> Gordon Martin Human wrote:
>
> > Just a wild guess, but wouldn't prolonged flight (including soaring)
> > *require* insulation of some type in any animal, due to the heat loss
> > associated with sustained passage of air over (relative to body volume)
> > large body surfaces?
> >
> > Can anyone propose an animal (other than insect) that fits the
> above flight
> > profiles that is *not* insulated in some way?
> >
> > cheers, martin
>
>
>
>