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Re: A sad day in Paleontology



I found your story about Dr. Colbert's last hours touching. Those who saw
Edward Cope at his last reported a similar event.  He was desperately ill
and yet his close friend Persifor Frazer reported that a few days before
he died Cope delivered "out of his delerium a lecture on the Felidae with
all his charm of manner and diction and all his profound knowledge of the
history of the suject." 
If I may be forgiven for saying so,  I like to think of them out there in
the beyond digging away at some bank of fossils.

Jane D

Noli me rogas; hic ego solum laboro

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
***********************************************************
   Jane P. Davidson Ph.D.  University of Nevada Reno

   jdhexen@aol.com

   fax 775-784-6655
   http://members.aol.com/Jdhexen/index.html
   http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Delphi/1536
    http://digitalart.artsci.unr.edu/ART.html
   ICQ  2286420

On Thu, 29 Nov 2001 MKIRKALDY@aol.com wrote:

> To add to the other tributes to Ned Colbert, here is an article from The 
> Arizona Republic (11/25/01 - A Life Remembered, by Connie Cone Sexton):
> http://www.arizonarepublic.com/arizona/articles/1125obitcolbert25.html
> 
> Quoting from the article's second from last paragraph:
> 
>        On the last day of his life, Colbert sat upright in bed, stared at the
>        window and started to give a lecture, as vibrant as he had been at
>        40.  Minutes later, he slipped into a coma and died.
> 
> 
> Mary
> mkirkaldy@aol.com
>