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maastricht ichtyornithid



Howdy mates!

Fellow member HP Aspidel asked me to forward these links:
http://www.nhmmaastricht.nl/engels/nieuws/nieuws03.htm
http://www.nhmmaastricht.nl/nederlands/nieuws/infokl.pdf

And for the reference:
http://www.cmnh.org/dinoarch/2002Aug/msg00043.html

with the description of the specimen.

Here is the translation from the identification of the isolated elements of
the skeleton from the .pdf file:
The line above says: "the prehistoric bird from the Maastrichtian Cretaceous
was nearly a "modern" bird but the teeth in it's jaw hint his relationships
to the dinosaurs"

Following are the translations from the figures surrounding the
reconstruction:
The specimen itself (left):
(the line pointing to the upper part of the specimen) "forearm"
(the line pointing to the middle part of the specimen) "jaw"
(the line pointing to the lower part of the specimen) "humerus/ upper arm"

The text below this figure is about the skeletal reconstruction next to it
and says:
"Of the light and delicate skeleton are only the bones colored in red
recovered"

Now for the reconstruction self:

(the line pointing to the hand) "the Cretaceous bird from Maastricht
(capital of the provence of Limburg) could already fly well
(the line pointing to the back) "pneumaticies in the vertebrae reduced the
weight of these elements
(the line pointing to the jaws) "the Cretaceous bird didn't had a beak, but
a mouth filled with teeth"
(the line pointing to the sternum) "the huge sternum has all the space for
powerfull flight muscles"
(the line pointing to the tail) "the tail is already much shorter than the
one found in dinosaurs"

I also have a newspaper article which basicly lists the same points as in
the short news-flash on the web or the original publication and it is pretty
general, so it's adds no new information about other specimens, recent
developments in the study of bird evolution or those sort of thing. After
all, we are talking about Holland here, a place that seems to be stuck in
Stone Age when it comes to dinosaur studies ;) But in it though there was
this beautifull photograph of the specimen in color in another view which is
available to anyone who wants it (B&W or color). Please send a message
offlist if you do.

Cheers,

Rutger Jansma