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Re: "Megapnosaurus" says farewell...



> Comparing the central storehouse of all zoological nomenclatural
> information to a phone list from a small scientific society shows your
> sense of unreality pretty well.

Naïve question -- is about 2000 members from around the world few in
comparison? (Tendency rising fast, the News Bulletin of Fall 2001 alone
gives the names, addresses, phone and fax numbers and e-mail addresses
(where present) of 127 new members.)

> Further, if it
> were, it would be too bad you don't know something about languages so at
> least you could derive it properly (recommendation 11A of ICZN), as we
> did,

Remember "Megalapnoosaurus"? :->

> or courteous enough to do create something euphonious
> (that means can be pronounced easily and sounds good -- have you tried
> Megapnosaurus out loud [Meg-ap-no-sar-us], by the way, really roles of the
> tounge nicely),

BTW, I question the applicability of the ICZN recommendation that says names
should be euphonious. There are languages without g (of all things,
contemporary Greek comes to mind, IIRC), without r (Chinese), and while I
have no problems at all with pn, I remember long threads on this list about
whether the second p in *Protopteryx* needed to be pronounced.

> We surely would [NOT] decide to sink the genus to get rid of the name!

The first time AFAIK that this subjective synonymy was suggested was in
1988. Since then, every time someone looked at the two species the more
similar they got. What still kept some people from accepting the synonymy
was the temporal distance (Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, with a big mass
extinction in between). Some of these might now be driven to accept it in
order to avoid the name *Megapnosaurus* -- I don't think that makes a real
difference, especially given how arbitrary the genus rank (like all others)
is.

Well, on the whole this was IMHO another example of the lamentable splitting
of science into hundreds of ivory towers that don't even get the idea of
communicating with one another (both ways).