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New papers in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica



Greetings,

Three papers of probable interest to the folks here in the latest issue of
APP.

First, the theropod one (which will strike a familiar chord with some on
this list...)

Maryanska,T.,Osmólska,H.,and Wolsan,M. 2002. Avialan status for
Oviraptorosauria.Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 47 (1):97 ?116.

A new phylogenetic analysis, mostly at the species level, for coelurosaurs.
The tree they find is (condensed):
Theropoda
  Herrerasaurus
  Neotheropoda
    Coelophysis
    Avetheropoda/Tetanurae
      Allosauroidea
      Coelurosauria
        Tyrannosauridae
        Maniraptoriformes
          Ornithomimosauria
          Maniraptora/Eumaniraptora
            Dromaeosauridae
            Avialae
              Therizinosauria
              Clade A
                Archaeopteryx
                Clade B
                  Confuciusornis
                  Oviraptorosauria
                    Avimimus
                    Clade C
                      Caudipteryx
                      Oviraptoroidea
                        Caenagnathidae
                        Oviraptoridae

So, in short, oviraptorosaurs are nested within the birds.  However,
unfortunately, typical "birds" are represented solely by Archaeopteryx and
Confuciusornis, and the characters that unite Clade B are quadrate with the
lateral cotyla for the quadratojugal (42.1); mandibular
symphysis tightly sutured (72.1); maxillary teeth lost (96.2); dentary teeth
lost (97.1). The fifth synapomorphy,a large parietal comparable in size to
or longer than the frontal (26.1), was recognized under ACCTRAN only.
Unfortunately for this interesting hypothesis, characters 72.1, 96.2, and
97.1 are known to be absent (that is, the primitive state is present) for
many non-cofuciusornithid Mesozoic birds (enantiornithines,
ichthyornithiforms, hesperornithiforms, etc.) which share considerable
additional derived characters with modern birds which are lacking in
oviraptorosaurs.

Thus, I would take the precise results of this analysis with a major grain
of salt.  Nevertheless, a great wealth of information in this paper.  Also,
once again Avimimus and Caudipteryx come out as oviraptorosaurs.

-------------

Averianov,A.O.,Voronkevich,A.V.,Maschenko,E.N.,Leshchinskiy,S.V.,and
Fayngertz,A.V. 2002.A sauropod foot from the Early Cretaceous of Western
Siberia,Russia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 47 (1):117 ?124.

Pretty much what it says...  Based on the morphology of the partial foot, it
is referrable to Titanosauriformes.

------------

Say you wanted to see a really comprehensive review of the phylogeny of
non-avian theropods, and found out that there was a paper written by Currie,
me, Makovicky, Norell, Sereno & Sues (and maybe a few others)?  That *might*
begin to resemble the importance of the following paper:
Luo,Z.-X., Kielan-Jaworowska,Z., and Cifelli,R.L. 2002. In quest for a
phylogeny of Mesozoic mammals. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 47 (1):1 ?78.

Okay, to be even better they could have had a few of the AMNH guys in
there...  A BIG (78 pp.) paper with a detailed, generally species/genus
level phylogenetic analysis of Mesozoic mammals.  46 taxa, 275 characters.
Tritylodonts + Haramyavia, tritheledonts, Sinoconodon, moganucodonts,
Haldanodon, Haldrocodium, and Kuehenotherium are progressively closer sister
taxa to crown group mammals.  Crown group mammals split into monotremes and
their extinct allies, and the clade comprised of eutricondonts,
multituberculates, various other Mesozoic forms, and Theria.  They point out
various alternatives which are slightly longer than the most parisimonious
(for example, a monophyletic Allotheria comprised of multituberculates and
Haramyavia, which winds up outside of crown-group mammals).

A must-have paper for Mesozoic mammal workers.

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796