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RE: Acrocanthosaurus atokensis locomotion



Jordan Mallon (j_mallon@hotmail.com) wrote:

<Correction: I double checked this today, and as it turns out, Farlow
makes no mention as to what might have made those tracks.  Speed estimates
in this paper range from 1.8 - 12.1 m/s, using Alexander's old equation.>

  Nonetheless, Farlow has made statements, along with Thomas, as to the
origin of the tracks as being *Acrocanthosaurus* or similar large
theropod.

  Thomas, D.A. and Farlow, J.I. 1997. Tracking a dinosaur attack.
_Scientific American_ 1997 (12): 74-79.

  Farlow, J.I. and Chapman, R.E. 1997. The scientific study of dinosaur
footprints. pg. 519-553 _in_ Farlow and Brett-Surman (eds.) _The Complete
Dinosaur_ (Indiana University Press [Bloomington & Indianapolis]).

  In one other paper, the most thourough treatment presently of the tracks
(Farlow reports progressive reports for a better analysis, based on work
by himself, and Thomas and himself):

  Farlow, J.I. 1987. A guide to Lower Cretaceous dinosaur footprints and
tracksites of the Paluxy River Valley, Somervell County, Texas. pg. 1-109
(incl. 39 figures, 2 tables [one table is of great length, extending over
10 pages]). South Central GSA, Baylor University.

  Here, the footprints are associated as similar to *Allosaurus* and
larger theropods of like ilk.

=====
Jaime A. Headden

  Little steps are often the hardest to take.  We are too used to making leaps 
in the face of adversity, that a simple skip is so hard to do.  We should all 
learn to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than zoom by it.

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