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Re: Speed in giants and cursors



Jerzy Dyczkowski (jerzyd@poczta.ibb.waw.pl) wrote:

<Maybe somebody can at least tell, if large theropods could kick forward
and upwards or tear prey with their hindlegs? If I remember right, the
famous fossil thropod-sauropod trackway shows animal doing two steps on
just one leg, presumably hitting the prey with the other leg.>

  Reading the Farlow and Smith studies, and from what I know of
discussions on the tracksite, this was posited not as the animal kicking,
but "hopping" to reset stride, presumably because the predator had
"engaged" the sauropod assault-style. It need do nothing so much with that
leg but to simply not put it down. Apparently, birds and crocs will do the
same thing when accelerating. Jim Farlow say: "More to come..." :) His
study (soooo many lines of evidence) is only now, as he wrote, being
finalized on paper.

=====
Jaime A. Headden

  Little steps are often the hardest to take.  We are too used to making leaps 
in the face of adversity, that a simple skip is so hard to do.  We should all 
learn to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than zoom by it.

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