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Re: Flight of the Dodo (and solitaire)



In a message dated 3/8/02 1:11:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
TiJaWi@agron.iastate.edu writes:

> Yeah, that makes perfect sense.  And if the dodo's didunculine relatives are
>  any guide, large body size may have come before total flightlessness.  I 
saw
>  a crowned pigeon once - they are among the most jaw-droppingly amazing 
birds
>  I have ever seen.

I was once in the aviary at the San Diego Zoo with some friends, and the 
crowned pigeon followed us around the entire time we were there, pecking at 
my friend's bright blue warm-up pants.  I think it was in love!

On a more relevant note to those interested in columbid phylogeny, this paper 
appeared in the October, 2001 issue of _The Auk_:

A MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY OF THE DOVE GENERA STREPTOPELIA AND COLUMBA. Kevin P. 
Johnson, Selvino de Kort, Karen Dinwoodey, A. C. Mateman, Carel ten Cate, C. 
M. Lessells, and Dale H. Clayton.  The Auk, vol. 118, no. 4, pages 874â887.

It turns out _Nesoenas_ (the Pink Pigeon) is nested (no pun intended) within 
_Streptopelia_, and New World "_Columba_" species are outside the group 
comprised of Old World _Columba_ + _Streptopelia_ (incl. "_Nesoenas_").

The authors recommend sinking _Nesoenas_ into _Streptopelia_ and splitting 
_Patagioenas_ (New World) from _Columba_ (Old World).

--Nick P.