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RE: Velociraptor profiles and a little background



Tim:

You wrote: "casting _Velociraptor_ as the aggressor/predator and
_Velociraptor_ as the
victim/prey remains the most parsimonious interpretation for the pose. "

I think the second _Velociraptor_ should be _Protoceratops_.  :-)

Also: EQ = Encephalization Quotient (i.e. the brain mass versus total mass
ratio).
In other words, their brains got bigger as their bodies stayed around the
same size, in order to improve their accuracy and safety while pouncing.

Allan Edels

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu]On Behalf Of
Williams, Tim
Sent: Monday, March 18, 2002 3:21 PM
To: 'dinosaur@usc.edu'
Subject: RE: Velociraptor profiles and a little background


John Conway wrote:

> This debate is far from dead. Indeed, the original "fighting"
> interpretation still seems to have the most support. So unless you can
> show me otherwise, I will still regard the specimen as example of
> Velociraptor using its toe claws for predation.

I agree.  What clinches it for me is the proximity of _Velociraptor_'s
sickle-claw to the neck of the _Protoceratops_.  No disrespect is intended
toward those who proffer alternative explanations - you might be right, and
I wasn't actually there to witness the encounter (despite what the DA
says... *grumble grumble*).  But seriously, as Mary said, casting
_Velociraptor_ as the aggressor/predator and _Velociraptor_ as the
victim/prey remains the most parsimonious interpretation for the pose.


Waylon Rowley wrote:

> It's easy to imagine flight evolving from
> pouncing/parachuting behavior. Obviously some of these
> keen lil mammals would see the predator coming and
> make a run for it. Evolution would favor those animals
> capable of controlling their descent with more
> accuracy and prolonging "air time".

Indeed.  "Perch hunting" as the primordial avian behavior.

> That might explain
> the increased EQ in some very bird-like maniraptors as
> well as a more sophisticated auditory apparatus (e.g.
> Troodontids).

EQ = Educational quotient?  Has anything been published on this?



Tim


------------------------------------------------------------

Timothy J. Williams

USDA-ARS Researcher
Agronomy Hall
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50014

Phone: 515 294 9233
Fax:   515 294 3163