[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: birds/dino-birds with teeth



David Marjanovic wrote:
 
> I agree. Another possibility might be that a beak
> provides a smooth cutting edge if it's toothless; 

That's kinda "after-the-fact" though. 

> Why would a beak impede teeth? Do you mean
> it lay lateral to the teeth, corresponding to lips >
rather than to cornified gums?

So we're talking about full-blown beaks that extend
into the palatal area? I was thinking of something a
little more lateral, yes. 

> Well, it appears to be a specialized, derived
> lineage on its own, so that might not tell much 
> about birds. 

Well, somewhat. It doesn't depart *that* far from the
norm, if you ask me. Other than the elongate finger, I
don't see any other novel (in that they don't appear
in other avepectorans) adaptations.

> Good idea -- but then I'd still think the reverted
> hallux should come first

HP Gregory Paul discussed some middle Jurassic prints
that show fairly big avepods with retroverted halluces
in DA. Interesting stuff.

Cheers,
Waylon Rowley

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Health - your guide to health and wellness
http://health.yahoo.com