[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: In defense of paleoart (was: Re: In (premature) defense of the USNM)



> Well, that's the law of the jungle for ya...one way or another, we _are_ a
> product of evolution, so maybe evolution screwed itself over...?

*** Maybe your not really far off the mark.  In the ultimate of ironies, it
may be
through evolution of the most sophisticated mentality ( an upright ape )
that the
planet ultimately brings about it's own annihilation.

Seriously,
> though, how many other species are concerned about conservation on a
global
> scale at all? Many species (elephants, for example) don't seem to care one
> way or another about the havoc they bring to a given ecosystem when, say,
> they mow down a forest.

*** Seriously, if elephants and other vertebrates had the capacity to
understand
what was happening around them globally and the skill and dexterity to do
something about it, I think they'd be actively racing against us in manned
(pachydermed) missions to other planets!

[ I'M GONNA THROW IN A REFERENCE TO "DINOSAURS" MARY,
WAIT FOR IT. . .]

*** Unfortunately, although elephants are fairly intelligent in their own
right,
they still are not capable of achieving self-determination with intent.
Life goes
on, species evolve and go extinct, at times impacting on other members of
the
community, but all that is beyond their ability to reason out and make
choices
about. They are exempt from the folies of their lifestyle, even when it
reeks havoc
upon the environment they live in, because that is all a part of the process
of natural
history. We are the aberrant form, because we could selectively choose to
have a
much less invasive impact upon the world around us and yet elect to alter
the
landscape to the detriment of not only all other creatures inhabiting the
planet,
but ourselves as well.  How many elephants would it take to mutilate the
earth's
surface in the manner mankind has managed since we cultivated our talent for
the building of "civilization".

 We might be masters of exploitation, but we are also
> probably the most farsighted in terms of conservation as well...ah, the
hell
> that is self-awareness...

*** That falls under the category marked "Too little, too late."  While
their are a
minority of the populace concerned with protecting what resources we have
left
and acting as advocates for those "lesser" creatures incapable of informed
speech,
the current state of the planet and the direction in which it is heading,
usually falls
upon deaf ears. Maybe the problem is we direct too much of our own
intellectual
prowess in self admiration. . . patting ourselves on the back for a job well
done. . .
and because any of the rest of our co-inhabitants are both unable and
unwilling to
do so for us. . . We, as the culmination of vertebrate evolution on this
planet, at this
particular point in time, are capable of so much more. . . and yet popular
culture
still refers to dinosaurs as "slow and stupid". . . :o)

Cheers,

Mike Skrepnick


> -Chris Srnka
>