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Re: Idaho dinosaurs



  I appologize for the cross-posting. However, this thread is in direct
relevance, though it started on the dinosaur mailing list, to a thread on
the vertpaleo list, that should be of interest to everyone. You need to be
proud of Idaho, you know... :)

  Tracy Ford [on the Dinosaur Mailing List] rightfully prompts me to
append the short address access to the papers:

  I wrote:

<Anyone insterested should get both volumes of the "And whereas..."
series, with vol. 3 in the works, and they can be examined at
http://www.isu.edu>

  The address for the first volume is at:

http://www.isu.edu/departments/museum/earth_science_division/Vol1Contents.htm

  and for the second volume at:

http://www.isu.edu/departments/museum/earth_science_division/Volume2.htm

  There are lot on mammals described here, few on Cretaceous critters, but
for me anyway, there is a lot of promise in getting to this stuff.

  Idaho is sorta overlooked when it comes to fossils, largely because
other states regard it as "backwater" and the oft-used international joke
about potato farmers ... despite the more prevalent mineralogical and
cattle industry we have. The Snake River Basin has a rich geological
history, and it is in this basin that the famous Hagerman Beds are
located, about 150 miles east of Boise and 250 miles west of Pocatello,
near Twin Falls. Its worth it, if anyone wanted to go. I doubt BSU
(closest University of any great size) would fund prepping an SVP, but
Pocatello might, given ISU's geology/paleontology program, though minor,
is quite extensive. And going to the Craters of the Moon NP, our limited
Cretaceous exposures (though very much in the vacinity of Pocatello), and
Hagerman NP, would be a good thing. Note, we have the Idaho Horse, *Equus
idahoensis*, of which a mounted specimen is present at DMNH as I saw on
the 99 SVP, as a bonebed, not to mention lots of *Teleoceras*. Would be
worth it.

  How about you, Bill?

  Cheers,

=====
Jaime A. Headden

  Little steps are often the hardest to take.  We are too used to making leaps 
in the face of adversity, that a simple skip is so hard to do.  We should all 
learn to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than zoom by it.

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