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Dinos galore in JVP 22(3)!!



Greetings,

The online version of the latest issue of JVP is available for those who
have access to such:
http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=get-toc&issn=0272-4634&volume=022&issu
e=03

Several dinosaur papers, to numerous to review in detail now.  I'll even
have to restrict this to Mesozoic dinosaur papers: some Cenozoic bird
papers, Mesozoic croc papers, Mesozoic marine reptile papers, etc.

Some time ago on the list I warned that some really important new basal
tetanurine papers were coming out soon.  They are in this issue!

Here are the titles:

A NEW IGUANODONTIAN ORNITHOPOD FROM NEUQUEN BASIN, PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA.
RODOLFO A. CORIA and JORGE O. CALVO, pages 503?509.

Names Anabisetia saldiviai.

THE OSTEOLOGY OF MASIAKASAURUS KNOPFLERI, A SMALL ABELISAUROID (DINOSAURIA:
THEROPODA) FROM THE LATE CRETACEOUS OF MADAGASCAR. MATTHEW T. CARRANO, SCOTT
D. SAMPSON, and CATHERINE A. FORSTER, pages 510?534.

What it says.  New and more detailed information on the anatomy of the
critter. Their phylogenetic analysis yields Dilophosaurus as closer to
neotheropods than to coelophysoids, Elaphrosaurus as the basalmost
ceratosaur, a polytomy of basal abelisauroids (including Masiakasaurus), and
a monophyletic Abelisauridae.

IRRITATOR CHALLENGERI, A SPINOSAURID (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) FROM THE LOWER
CRETACEOUS OF BRAZIL. HANS-DIETER SUES, EBERHARD FREY, DAVID M. MARTILL, and
DIANE M. SCOTT, pages 535?547.

The fully prepped out skull shows that the "crest" was some misplaced bone
with no apparent contact with the skull roof.  There is no promaxillary or
maxillary fenestra: what was thought to be the inner surface of the
antorbital fossa was in fact the palatines.  The authors consider
"Suchomimus" to be a junior synonym of Baryonyx.

DISCOVERY OF MEGALOSAUR (DINOSAURIA, THEROPODA) IN THE MIDDLE BATHONIAN OF
NORMANDY (FRANCE) AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PHYLOGENY OF BASAL TETANURAE.
RONAN ALLAIN, pages 548?563.

Ever wondered what a good primitive basal tetanurine skull looked like?
Here it is!  Poekilopleuron? valesdunesis, a new specimen questionably
referred to Poekilopleuron.  The postcrania is still being described.
Possess a long, low, unornamented skull (not dissimilar to Afrovenator).

EMBRYOS AND EGGS FOR THE CRETACEOUS THEROPOD DINOSAUR TROODON FORMOSUS.
DAVID J. VARRICCHIO, JOHN R. HORNER, and FRANKIE D. JACKSON, pages 564?576.

Redescribes the "Orodromeus" eggs and embryoes as being Troodon.

RICH DINOSAUR NESTING SITE FROM THE CRETACEOUS OF BOSUNG COUNTY,
CHULLANAM-DO PROVINCE, SOUTH KOREA. MIN HUH and DARLA K. ZELENITSKY, pages
716?718.

What it says: eggs from Korea.

AN AVIAN EGG FROM THE CAMPANIAN OF BAYN DZAK, MONGOLIA. GERALD
GRELLET-TINNER and MARK NORELL, pages 719?721.

A short description of an egg from Mongolia.

A FURCULA IN THE COELOPHYSID THEROPOD SYNTARSUS. RONALD S. TYKOSKI,
CATHERINE A. FORSTER, TIMOTHY ROWE, SCOTT D. SAMPSON, and DARLINGTON
MUNYIKWA, pages 728?733.

Finally published!  Present in both the African and American material.
Indicates that furculae were present in the common ancestor of coelophysids
and tetanurines.

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796