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New references



Greetings,

Here's a couple of new papers out:
PETER J. MAKOVICKY, MARK A. NORELL, JAMES M. CLARK, and TIMOTHY ROWE. 2003.
Osteology and Relationships of _Byronosaurus jaffei_ (Theropoda:
Troodontidae). American Museum Novitates: No. 3402, pp. 1?32.

Nicely detailed description (with CAT scanned images) of _Byronosaurus_.
Features described for the first time in Troodontidae include an extensive
secondary palate, an tubular opening interpreted as a subnarial foramen
(also found in Alvarezsauridae), and a connection between the antorbital and
accessory fenestrae though the interfenestral bar.

The authors recognize the following as troodontid synapomorphies:
Dentary nutrient foramina situated in a horizontal groove on labial face of
dentary
Pneumatic quadrate with pneumatopore on posterior face
Basisphenoid recess absent
Dorsoventrally flattened internarial bar
Closely packed anterior dentition in symphyseal region of dentary
Depression on the ventral surface of the postorbital process of the
laterosphenoid
Reduced basal tubera that lie directly ventral to the occipital condyle
Large number of teeth
Long, slender transverse processes

and the following unite all non-_Sinovenator_ troodontids:
Presence of a subotic recess on the side of the braincase ventral to the
middle ear
Metatarsal IV oval in cross section, deeper than wide
Large otosphenoidal crest defining lateral depression on side of braincase
Presence of enlarged, distally oriented denticles

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Also just out:
Holtz, T.R., Jr. 2003. Dinosaur predation: evidence and ecomorphology. Pp.
325-340, in P.H. Kelley, M. Kowalewski and T.A Hansen (eds.), Predator-Prey
Interactions in the Fossil Record, Topics in Geobiology Vol. 20. Kluwer
Press.

>From the acknowledgments: "The author would like to acknowledge... the
participants of the Internet Dinosaur Mailing List (dinosaur@usc.edu), for
sharing their thoughts and comments on the predatory modes of theropod
dinosaurs."

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796