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This just in: online version of JVP



Greetings,

Came across the latest (Vol. 22, Num. 4, December 2002) issue of JVP online.
This is at:
http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=get-toc&issn=0272-4634&volume=022&issu
e=04
(but note that only people or institutions with Bioone subscriptions can
access this).

I do NOT know if the issue is accompanied by a Memior of the SVP: I know
that a ***major*** such memior is due out very soon, and may be bundled with
this issue in print.

Lots of papers of interest to those on this list, including two newly named
dinosaurs (a pachycephalosaur and an oviraptorid).  In brief, the fossil
reptile papers include:

NEW MATERIAL OF QIANICHTHYOSAURUS LI, 1999 (REPTILIA, ICHTHYOSAURIA) FROM
THE LATE TRIASSIC OF SOUTHERN CHINA, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION
OF TRIASSIC ICHTHYOSAURS. ELIZABETH L. NICHOLLS, CHEN WEI, and MAKOTO
MANABE, pages 759?765.

The "cover girl" for the issue; a 1.5 m long little critter.  Closely
related to the North American _Toretocnemus californicus_.  This and other
recent work suggest that ichthyosaurs had relatively cosmopolitan
distributions: not too surprising for pelagic forms.

THE EYES HAVE IT: THE SIZES, SHAPES, AND ORIENTATIONS OF THEROPOD ORBITS AS
INDICATORS OF SKULL STRENGTH AND BITE FORCE. DONALD M. HENDERSON, pages
766?778.

Don has examined the relationships between orbit size, shape, and
orientation in the context of the 3-D shapes of theropod skulls.  He finds
various associated interrelationships between these parameters, tooth
orientation, and tooth size.  He suggests that the form of the orbit in
strong-skulled taxa is controlled by the requirements of the rear of the
skull with regards to musculature, joints, etc.

Three guesses as to which of the big theropods comes out as the strongest
skulled...

A NEW GENUS OF DERIVED PACHYCEPHALOSAURIAN FROM WESTERN NORTH AMERICA.
THOMAS E. WILLIAMSON and THOMAS D. CARR, pages 779?801.

Introduces _Sphaerotholus goodwini_ from the Kirtland Fm. of New Mexico and
_S. buchholtzae_ from the Hell Creek of Montana.  _Sphaerotholus_
(sphere-dome) is a round-headed pachycephalosaur similar to _Prenocephale_:
indeed, the second specimen is a specimen formerly referred by Sullivan to
_Prenocephale edmontonensis_ (Brown and Schlaikjer 1943).  They examine
pahcycephalosaur ontogeny and phylogeny, and suggest that _Ornatotholus_ is
a juvenile _Stegoceras_.  Their phylogenetic analysis puts _Sphaerotholus_
as the sister taxon to _Stygimoloch_ + _Pachycephalosaurus_, with
_Prenocephale_ + _Tylocephale_ as the sister group to those North American
forms, and _Stegoceras_ spp. as the sister taxon to Pachycephalosaurinae.

THE BRAINCASE OF GIGANOTOSAURUS CAROLINII (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) FROM THE
UPPER CRETACEOUS OF ARGENTINA. RODOLFO A. CORIA and PHILIP J. CURRIE, pages
802?811.

Excellent detailed study of the braincase of _Giganotosaurus_.  They
document many similarities between _Gig._ and _Carcharodontosaurus_
braincases (no surprise there), with sinraptorids more similar to these guys
than are _Acrocanthosaurus_ and _Allosaurus_.

TESTING THE PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF THE PLEISTOCENE SNAKE WONAMBI
NARACOORTENSIS SMITH. OLIVIER RIEPPEL, ARNOLD G. KLUGE, and HUSSAM ZAHER,
pages 812?829.

It's a macrostomatan.

AN ENIGMATIC NEW DIAPSID REPTILE FROM THE UPPER PERMIAN OF EASTERN EUROPE.
SEAN P. MODESTO and ROBERT R. REISZ, pages 851?855.

Introduces _Lanthanolania ivakhnenkoi_ (Ivakhneko's forgotten (or
overlooked) ripper), a Permian probable lepidosauromorph (but arguably the
sister taxon to Sauria (= lepidosauromorphs + archosauromorphs) as a whole.
This specimen had been catalogued in the collections as an individual of the
synapsid taxon _Mesenosaurus_: hence the "overlooked" part of its name.
Little critter: skull is about 30 mm long.

FIRST AVIAN SKELETON FROM THE MESOZOIC OF NORTHERN GONDWANA. FABIO M. DALLA
VECCHIA and LUIS M. CHIAPPE, pages 856?860.

A partial enantiornithine skeleton from the Cenomanian of Lebanon.  A few
small blobs of amber were found inside the specimen.

EXCEPTIONALLY PRESERVED SKELETONS OF THE CRETACEOUS SNAKE DINILYSIA
PATAGONICA WOODWARD, 1901. MICHAEL W. CALDWELL and ADRIANA ALBINO, pages
861?866.

What it says.

A NEW OVIRAPTOROSAURID [sic] (THEROPODA: OVIRAPTOROSAURIA) FROM THE LATE
CRETACEOUS OF SOUTHERN CHINA. JUNCHANG LÜ, pages 871?875.

Introduces _Heyuannia huangi_ (after the Heyuan fossil locality near Heyuan
City, Guangdong, and Dong Huang, the director of Heyuan Museum).  This
specimen was the subject of a poster session at SVP last year.  A good
portion of the skeleton, with an incomplete skull, from the ?Maastrichtian
Dalangshan Fm.  Of note: precaudal counts of 13-12-8 (for
cervical-dorsal-sacral); pneumatic foramina in the cervical ribs; fairly
laterally-oriented glenoids; semilunate carpal block fused to mc I and II;
mc III does not reach the wrist; pubis and ischium nearly identical in
length. Lu suggests that this taxon supports an avialian position for
Oviraptorosauria, but does not provide a phylogenetic analysis (nor does the
paper address the implications of the less-avialian nature of more basal
oviraptorosaurs).

Cool stuff.

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796