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Re: the bipedal ptero-challenge



David Peters challenged, 'rattling his saber:

>For Ray Stanford, Jim Cunningham and anyone else who thinks, knows or
believes that pterosaurs could not have walked, run or stood bipedally,
here's a challenge:< [Snip.]

    He can count me out of the challenge because this ludicrous response
clearly indicates that Peters didn't read my most recent posting on this in
which I clearly stated:

    >Furthermore, I have never asserted that no species of pterosaur could
ever have progressed bipedally on occasion.  I hope no one reads 'words'
into my statements that were never intended.  To the contrary, in fact, I
should, indeed, be surprised if bipedal progression of a pterosaur never,
ever happened.<

    Evidently Peters reads people's communications as accurately as he reads
osteological and ichnological elements!

    Ray Stanford

"You know my method.  It is founded upon the observance of trifles." --
Sherlock Holmes in The Boscombe Valley Mystery
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Peters" <davidrpeters@earthlink.net>
To: "dinosaur list" <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2003 1:19 PM
Subject: the bipedal ptero-challenge


For Ray Stanford, Jim Cunningham and anyone else who thinks, knows or
believes that pterosaurs could not have walked, run or stood bipedally,
here's a challenge:

Since it is obvious to some that pterosaurs lack certain bipedal
characters, the challenge is to come up with a list of one to ten
physical characters that pterosaur _lack_ that would make them capable
bipeds if they had them.

I'll come up with the first one:

1) they lack bipedal tracks.

Okay, guys, let'erip! I'm serious. I think I must be missing something.

dp



P.S. Old pterosaur news:

Jim, you can pull that wings web page whenever you wish. I think we can
assume that everyone who has wanted to see it has seen it. And thank
you.

"Ctenochasma"  porocrista turns out to be basal to Huanhepterus + the
Azhdarchidae, and not too far from the Ctenochasmatidae. Now instead of
just P. kochi and P. antiquus we have evidence for a wonderful early
splitting of the pterodactylids into distinct basal forms for all the
subsequent pterodactyloids, including the ctenochasmatids,
gallodactylids, sword-nosed forms, ornithocheirids and the azhdarchids.

_All_ pterodactyloids have a premaxillary crest (though quite small and
soft in some) and _all_ have a frontal crest (again often small and
soft).

There's also an interesting development of the vomer into a ridge that
descends nearly the length of the teeth lateral to it in a basal
pterodactyloid clade leading toward the dsungaripterids and their
toothless sword-nosed sister taxa.

More later.

David Peters
St. Louis