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New JVP online



Greetings,

The latest issue of JVP (23(2)) is now online at:
http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=get-toc&issn=0272-4634&volume=023&issu
e=02

A paper or two that I've been waiting for now for a while are... not in it.
(Damn!).

However, a lot of interesting things:
A series on Missing Data in Phylogenetics, based on the SVP 2000 (Mexico
City) symposium:

PROBLEMS DUE TO MISSING DATA IN PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES INCLUDING FOSSILS: A
CRITICAL REVIEW. MAUREEN KEARNEY and JAMES M. CLARK, pages 263?274.

MISSING ENTRY REPLACEMENT DATA ANALYSIS: A REPLACEMENT APPROACH TO DEALING
WITH MISSING DATA IN PALEONTOLOGICAL AND TOTAL EVIDENCE DATA SETS. MARK A.
NORELL and WARD C. WHEELER, pages 275?283.

EVALUATION OF THE PRINCIPAL-COMPONENT AND EXPECTATION-MAXIMIZATION METHODS
FOR ESTIMATING MISSING DATA IN MORPHOMETRIC STUDIES. RICHARD E. STRAUSS,
MOMCHIL N. ATANASSOV, and JOÃO ALVES DE OLIVEIRA, pages 284?296.

INCOMPLETE TAXA, INCOMPLETE CHARACTERS, AND PHYLOGENETIC ACCURACY: IS THERE
A MISSING DATA PROBLEM?. JOHN J. WIENS, pages 297?310.

MISSING ENTRIES AND MULTIPLE TREES: INSTABILITY, RELATIONSHIPS, AND SUPPORT
IN PARSIMONY ANALYSIS. MARK WILKINSON, pages 311?323.

Fossil non-dinosaurian reptiles:

DECOMPRESSION SYNDROME IN PLESIOSAURS (SAUROPTERYGIA: REPTILIA). BRUCE M.
ROTHSCHILD and GLENN W. STORRS, pages 324?328.

Avascular necrosis is common in most plesiosaurs, but not in basal
sauropterygians (not a surprise in those likely non-diving, non-pelagic
animals) nor in cryptoclidids.

A NEW CROCODYLOMORPH ARCHOSAUR FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC OF NORTH CAROLINA.
HANS-DIETER SUES, PAUL E. OLSEN, JOSEPH G. CARTER, and DIANE M. SCOTT, pages
329?343.

Names a new sphenosuchian crocodylomorph _Dromicosuchus grallator_ from the
Late Triassic of Durham County, NC.  Phylogenetic analysis places it close
to _Hesperosuchus_ and _Kayentasuchus_.  (Incidentally, there is a typo on
the cladograms: the new form is shown as "Dromaeosuchus").

THE PHYLOGENETIC POSITION OF SINEOAMPHISBAENA HEXATABULARIS REEXAMINED.
MAUREEN KEARNEY, pages 394?403.

Not a basal amphisbaenian, but in fact a macrocephalid lizard.

A PHYTOSAUR FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC OF BRAZIL. EDIO-ERNST KISCHLAT and
SPENCER G. LUCAS, pages 464?467.

First description of the fragmentary phytosaur remains from the same
locality as _Guabiasaurus_ (and, more importantly, the first definite
phytosaurs of South America).

A NEW NOTOSUCHIAN FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS OF NIGER. P. C. SERENO, C. A.
SIDOR, H. C. E. LARSSON, and B. GADO, pages 477?482.

Description of _Anatosuchus minor_, the little duck croc from the
Gadoufaoua.  A little guy (70 cm long) with a very short broad snout.
Sister taxon to _Comahuesuchus_, and

And the Mesozoic dinosaurs:

THE EVOLUTION OF VERTEBRAL PNEUMATICITY IN SAUROPOD DINOSAURS. MATHEW J.
WEDEL, pages 344?357.

Complements Matt's work in Paleobiology.  Observes that the highly pneumatic
(polycamerate and camellate) vertebrae of _Mamenchisaurus_, diplodocids, and
many titanosauriforms was most likely convergent, and associated with the
extremely long necks of these groups.

FERGANASAURUS VERZILINI, GEN. ET SP. NOV., A NEW NEOSAUROPOD (DINOSAURIA,
SAURISCHIA, SAUROPODA) FROM THE MIDDLE JURASSIC OF FERGANA VALLEY,
KIRGHIZIA. VLADIMIR R. ALIFANOV and ALEXANDER O. AVERIANOV, pages 358?372.

A new sauropod based on a partial skeleton from the Middle Jurassic
(Callovian) Balabansai Formation.  Using an updated version of Upchurch's
1998 database, it comes out as a basal neosauropod (in a polytomy with
Macronaria, Diplodocoidea, and _Jobaria_).  Discovered by Prof. Nikita N.
Verzilin in 1966 and collected by a team led by A. K. Rozhdestvensky, it was
informally named "ferganasaurus" by Rozdestvensky in a popular audience book
(in Russian) back in 1969!  Additional sauropod bits and pieces have been
collected from the Balabansai in subsequent years, and will be described
later.  Good limb material on this guy!

OSTEOHISTOLOGY OF CONFUCIUSORNIS SANCTUS (THEROPODA: AVES). A. J. DE
RICQLÈS, K. PADIAN, J. R. HORNER, E.-T. LAMM, and N. MYHRVOLD, pages
373?386.

An illegally sold specimen of _Confuciusornis_ (subsequently returned to
China) was sectioned.  The thickness of the fibrolamellar bones suggests 20
weeks from hatching to maturity, but possibly as quick as 8-13 weeks: slower
than many modern birds of the same size, but comparable to (among others)
tinamous.  Interestingly, the rate of bone growth is slower than those of
non-avian dinosaurs: de Ricqlès et al. suggest that the shape and the small
body size of basal avialians was achieved initially by shortening the
duration of rapid growth but allowing for heterochronically accelerated
growth of some body parts (arms, hands, feathers).

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796