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Re: Fwd: Re: New Study, T rex Could've Been A Scavenger



>Personally, i think this study has many, many flaws. It's highly improbable 
>that Tyrannosaurus had a reptilian metabolism, and we will never know 
>whether Hell Creek had prey concentrations & populations close to that of 
>the Serengeti. We shall always have to consider that every mammalian 
>carnivore today is a predator to some extent. 

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Regardless of what Bakker, Paula and others have stated on the matter, there is 
still no reason for _T.rex_ to not have been a bradymetabolic "good reptile." 
Work by Nicholas Hotton, James Farlow, James Spotila, Walter Auffenberg (to a 
lesser extent) and others, have shown that a large bradymetabolic animal can do 
just as well as a large tachymetabolic one. Some studies even show a general 
trend towards bradymetabolism in larger animals (which makes sense, if the 
entire point of being tachymetabolic is just to keep warm). 

Statements that a bradymetabolic critter couldn't form the same pred/prey 
ratios seen in the fossil record have been either rebutted, or seriously 
questioned, and statements about a lack of aerobic potential make no sense 
either (carrier's constraint in many modern reptiles is do to anatomy, not 
thermophysiology). 

Anyway, enough of my soap box spiel. The only other thing I can add to the 
skepticism on this recent research is that no modern reptilian predator is an 
obligate scavenger either.

Yep, to date the only way to make a living as a scavenger is to be a soarer.

That, or an insect. They can do anything. :)

Jura



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"I am impressed by the fact that we know less about many modern [reptile] types 
than we do of many fossil groups." 
- Alfred S. Romer  Osteology of the Reptiles

http://reptilis.net