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Re: Horn of plenty



Tim Donovon (sirius531@yahoo.com): wrote:

"Btw, in response to other posts: Witzke made it clear he was referring to
dinosaur diversity, not overall diversity. I'm not sure bonebeds are the best
evidence of gregarious behavior, since solitary dinosaurs could have congregated
in river beds during severe droughts. But with regard to Triceratops: IIRC,
there are trackways in CO which may indicate gregarious behavior."

  And what separates these tracks from identification as *Torosaurus,* for which
bonebed evidence does in fact suggest, unlike *Triceratops,* that any any point
in the year, they _did_ congregate? Incidentally, bonebeds of gregarious
behavior among ceratopsians found in Canada and Texas are implicated not through
dought condition association by the presence of age-classes and very young
forms, all entombed in flood deposits (not drought wading or lake deposits).
This suggests end-drought, end-lean period gregarious behavior in
*Centrosaurus,* *Pachyrhinosaurus,* *Einiosaurus,* and *Chasmosaurus.*

  Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden

  Little steps are often the hardest to take. We are too used to making leaps in
the face of adversity, that a simple skip is so hard to do.  We should all learn
to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than zoom by it.

  "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
----- Original Message -----
From: Tim Donovan <sirius531@yahoo.com>
To: <dinomaniac38@hotmail.com>; <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Cc: <ferociousfightingdinosaurs@groups.msn.com>
Sent: Tuesday, September 23, 2003 4:07 AM
Subject: Re: Horn of plenty




ville sinkkonen <dinomaniac38@hotmail.com> wrote:

>The styracosaurus frill spikes are as mentioned before a good defense when
>something is attacking above.

  They could have made it more difficult for a tyrannosaur to strike the
unprotected sides, if the stracosaur kept facing its opponent. Tyrannosaur
bodies were horizontal, so I don't think they towered above a ceratopsid.


>actually I think that they protect the muscles that attached to the superior
>temporal fenestra.
>Could this be it.....is there any ceratopsian frill which has bite mark on
>it???

 Read Happ's abstract in the current volume.

  Btw, in response to other posts: Witzke made it clear he was referring to
dinosaur diversity, not overall diversity. I'm not sure bonebeds are the best
evidence of gregarious behavior, since solitary dinosaurs could have congregated
in river beds during severe droughts. But with regard to Triceratops: IIRC,
there are trackways in CO which may indicate gregarious behavior.


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