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Bonobo Langur correction on Erickson et al & Filipina rails



Greetings Dr. Orenstein:

     Mea culpa et thank you for the cc: Blaffer-Hrdy wrote _The Langurs
Of Abu: Female And Male Strategies Of Reproduction_ not bonobos (musta
pulled that outa thin air and for amazon.com info)

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0674510577/qid=1092820235/sr=1-4/ref=sr_1_4/103-6117860-5340655?v=glance&s=books

Blaffer-Hrdy is a primatologist, I believe. Google gave this address
(among others)

http://www.americanscientist.org/template/ScientistNightstandTypeDetail/assetid/29023;_kDo5gR8Wy

     And now for overkill. . . .
     FYI from World Book on AOL.com
     Langur, «lahng GUR», is any of about 15 species of monkeys that
live throughout India and most of Southeast Asia. Langurs are called
"leaf-monkeys" because they eat chiefly leaves. The large stomach and
intestines of these monkeys give them a potbellied appearance.
Otherwise, langurs have a slender body, with a long tail. Their coat
may be red, brown, silver, gray, golden, or black.
     Adult langurs weigh from 11 to 40 pounds (5 to 18 kilograms). They
measure 17 to 31 inches (43 to 79 centimeters) long, not including a
21- to 42-inch (53- to 107-centimeter) tail. Males are larger than
females.
     Langurs live in habitats ranging from warm, humid swamp forests to
cold mountain areas. Almost all species live mainly in trees. A few
species may spend much of their time on the ground.
     Langurs live in groups that typically consist of from 10 to 40
members. Adult female langurs mate about once every two years. A
pregnant female carries her young inside her body from 150 to 220 days,
depending on the species. She almost always gives birth to one baby,
but twins occasionally are born. Langur babies are often brightly
colored. Other members of the group may help the mother care for her
young.
     The clearing of land for farming and lumber production threatens
the survival of a number of langur species. One such species, the
Hanuman langur, is regarded as a sacred animal by Hindus. For this
reason, langurs have long been protected in India.
     Scientific classification. Langurs belong to the Old World monkey
family, Cercopithecidae. The scientific name for the Hanuman langur is
Presbytis entellus.
______________

Contributor: Randall L. Susman, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomical
Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University. 

How to cite this article: To cite this article, World Book recommends
the following format: Susman, Randall L. "Langur." World Book Online
Reference Center. 2004. World Book, Inc. 18 Aug. 2004.
<http://www.aolsvc.worldbook.aol.com/wb/Article?id=ar312510>.  

and 

     Bonobo, «buh NOH boh», also called pygmy chimpanzee, is an African
ape closely related to the chimpanzee. It lives in a section of African
rain forest south of the Congo River in Congo (Kinshasa).
     Despite the name pygmy chimpanzee, bonobos average only slightly
smaller than their chimpanzee relatives. Adults weigh from 75 to 100
pounds (34 to 45 kilograms). Bonobos have smaller heads, flatter faces,
and longer lower limbs than do chimpanzees. They also possess coal
black hair; black faces, hands, and feet; and often pink lips and
eyelids.
     Bonobos spend much of their time in trees. They dive, hang, jump,
and swing acrobatically from branches. The apes have high-pitched
voices and may make birdlike sounds. Bonobos also visit the forest
floor, and they move along the ground when traveling long distances.
Like gorillas and chimpanzees, bonobos usually walk on all fours,
supporting the upper part of their bodies with their knuckles. The apes
occasionally walk on two legs.
     Bonobos live in social groups of about 7 to 10 individuals, which
include both males and females. The animals eat mostly fruits, but they
also consume other plant foods and animal meat. Bonobo groups may form
communities of up to 75 individuals. Scientists believe these groups
form only when food is especially plentiful.
     The bonobo is an endangered species. Only a relatively small
number of bonobos remain in the wild. People threaten the apes'
survival by destroying their habitat and by illegally hunting them.
     Scientific classification. The bonobo belongs to the great ape
family, Pongidae. Its scientific name is Pan paniscus.
______________

Contributor: Randall L. Susman, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomical
Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University. 

How to cite this article: To cite this article, World Book recommends
the following format: Susman, Randall L. "Bonobo." World Book Online
Reference Center. 2004. World Book, Inc. 18 Aug. 2004.
<http://www.aolsvc.worldbook.aol.com/wb/Article?id=ar726477>.  

Not outsourcing, brain fritzed on me :)

And on those Filipino rails: I work with a bunch of Filipinas and
they'll be glad to know what is going on in their country that I have
an interest in. I should make a coupla points. Thanks.

Regards,

Marc Bauer


                
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