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Pterosaur endothermy



Pterosaur endothermy

Regarding the recent comments on the list concerning pterosaur endothermy, it 
does seem to me that aerial insectivory, as pursued by anurognathids, or 
surface 
skimming, as conducted by Rhamphorhynchus, at least, would have required a 
substantial amount of flapping flight. Unfortunately, I do not have the 
relevant 
literature to hand, but from what I recall, such an activity just could not be 
sustained by the physiology typical of modern reptiles. I was under the 
(mistaken?) impression that pterosaurologists generally accepted the idea that 
pterosaur physiology was similar to, though not necessarily the same as, that 
found in birds and bats and that in its totality (e.g. 'hair', histological 
details, evidence for sustained flapping flight, neural development and so on) 
the evidence was pretty consistent with this idea. I don't doubt Jim 
Cunningham's 
comments re Quetzalcoatlus, but I do wonder if this particular species is a 
good 
model for what went on in other pterosaurs? Perhaps the most sensible thing 
that 
can be said at the present time is that the question of pterosaur physiology 
really needs some much more intensive research. 

Ta ra

Dave