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theropod book update



Thought I would pass on the latest on the theropod volume ("Carnivorous 
Dinosaurs") for Indiana University Press (this volume is a companion to "The 
Armored Dinosaurs"). The book manuscript is done and will go out in Monday's 
mail to IUP (Farlow should be pleased).
Here is the table of contents:

Part 1. THEROPODS OLD AND NEW
1.Tibiae of Small Theropod Dinosaurs from Southern England: from the Middle 
Jurassic of Stonesfield near Oxford and the Lower Cretaceous of the Isle of 
Wight. P. M. Galton and R. E. Molnar.
2. New Small Theropod from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming. 
Kenneth Carpenter, Clifford Miles and Karen Cloward.[names Tanycolagreus 
topwilsoni]
3. Redescription of the small maniraptoran theropods Ornitholestes and Coelurus 
from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming. Kenneth Carpenter, 
Clifford Miles, John H. Ostrom, and Karen Cloward.
4. The enigmatic theropod dinosaur Erectopus superbus (Sauvage 1882) from the 
Lower Albian of Louppy-le-Château (Meuse, France). Ronan Allain.
5. Holotype Braincase of Nothronychus Mckinleyi Kirkland and Wolfe, 2001 
(theropoda; Therizinosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) of 
West-central New Mexico. James I. Kirkland, David K. Smith, Douglas G. Wolfe
6. Anatomy of Harpymimus okladnikovi Barsbold and Perle, 1984 (Dinosauria; 
Theropoda) of Mongolia. Yoshitsugu Kobayashi and Rinchen Barsbold
7. Theropod Teeth from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian), Big Bend 
National Park, Texas. Julia T. Sankey, Barbara R. Standhardt, and Judith A. 
Schiebout.
8. Last Patagonian Non-avian Theropods. Rodolfo A. Coria and Leonardo Salgado 
Part 2. THEROPOD WORKING PARTS
9. Enamel Microstructure Variation Within the Theropoda. Kathy Stoksa
10. Bite Me: Biomechanical Models of Theropod Mandibles and Implications for 
Feeding Behavior. François Therien, Donald M. Henderson, and Christopher B. Ruff
11. Body and Tail Posture in Theropod Dinosaurs. Gregory S Paul
12. Furcula of Tyrannosaurus rex. Peter Larson and J. Keith Rigby, Jr.
13. The pectoral girdle and the forelimb of Heyuannia  (Dinosauria: 
Oviraptorosauria) Junchang Lü , Dong Huang, Licheng Qiu
Part 3. THEROPODS AS LIVING ANIMALS
14. Sexual Dimorphism in the Early Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur, Dilophosaurus 
and a Comparison with Other Related Forms. Robert Gay 
15. Sexual Selection and Sexual Dimorphism in Theropods. Ralph E. Molnar. 
16.  An unusual multi-individual, tyrannosaurid bonebed in the Two Medicine 
Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian) of Montana (USA) P. J. Currie, D. 
Trexler, E. B. Koppelhus, K. Wicks, and N. Murphy 
17  Evidence for Predator-Prey Relationship: Example from Allosaurus and 
Stegosaurus. Kenneth Carpenter, Frank Sanders, Lorrie A. McWhinney, and Lowell 
Wood.
18. Theropod Paleopathology: State of the Art Review. Bruce Rothschild and 
Darren H. Tanke

Note that the volume is devoted primarily to the much neglected non-avian 
theropods. I suspect the volume will be out in early '05. There are over 440 
manuscript pages (~300 printed pages, including figures). For a few of these 
authors this will be their first peer-reviewed scientific publication. 

The sauropod volume ("Thunder-Lizards")is nearing completion and should be 
submitted by next month, if not sooner. The last of the series, on 
non-ankylosaur dinosaurs ("Horns and Beaks") is moving forwards now, having 
been put on pause for about a year. 

I was surprised that only one DML person took me up on my open invitation (made 
about 2-3 years ago) to submit a manuscript to any of the volumes. Between me 
and the reviewer, we helped this author get his/her manuscript into shape that 
I doubt any of you will be able to pick it out. The author can be proud of 
their work.

Kenneth Carpenter