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Re: ?us-ascii?Q?Re=3A=20152nd=20anniversary=20of=20G=2E=20A=2E=20Mantell=27s=20death=20and=20the=20s



interesting list, but it doesn't give the criteria used to establish Greatness. 

>>> Vladimír  Socha <Seismosaurus@seznam.cz> 11/11/04 02:45 AM >>>
================= Original message =================
From: "Jaime A. Headden" <qilongia@yahoo.com>
To: dinosaur@usc.edu
Copy (Cc): david.marjanovic@gmx.at
Subject: Re: 152nd anniversary of G. A. Mantell's death and the short list of 
most important persons in the history of discovering fossils
Date: 11. 11. 2004 4:05
==================================================

< David Marjanovic (david.marjanovic@gmx.at) wrote:
< 
< <<Pliny the Elder (Plinius Secundus) 23-79 CE>>
< 
< <The Elder is "secundus"? ~:-|>
< 
<   In this case, Gaius Plinius Secundus.
< 
< <<Leonardo Da Vinci  15 April 1452 - 2 May 1519> 
< 
< <Isn't that da Vinci?>
< 
<   There are a lot of notes that transcribe Da Vinci, as much as L. da
< Vinci. It's a loosing battle, David.
< 
< <<Georg August Goldfuss  18 April 1782 - 2 October 1848>>
< 
< <Probably Goldfu?, but I don't know.>
< 
<   Probably both. Many transcriptions have popularized the name with the
< double "s" rather than the German form that "melded" them into "?." The
< "ss" is more popular, and historians would probably agree that a man's
< name can change with time and culture, as did Carolus Linnaeus, who had it
< changed in his father's time to Carl von Linn?, secondary to the birth
< name, apparently. And thank god Linnaeus isn't on this list, no positive
< contribution to paleontology.
< 
<   I would include Charles Robert Darwin [Feb. 12, 1809 - Apr. 19, 1882],
< though, as well as Alfred Russel Wallace [Jan. 8, 1823 - Nov. 7, 1913]
< sincetheir constributions did directly impact paleontology, and the
< former at least discussed fossils. Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer
< [Sept. 3, 1801 - Apr. 2, 1869, just after his publications on
< *Archaeopteryx*] (often just Hermann von Meyer) also contributed a great
< deal to early European geo, and Thomas Jefferson [Apr. 13, 1743 - Jul. 4,
< 1826] is said to have had some expansionist ideas impacting paleo.
< 
< <<Adolph D'Archiac  24 September 1802 - 24 December 1868>>
< 
< <If he's French, then he's Adolphe, and d'Archiac.>
< 
<   Amen to the little d, but, this is his full name, from French sources:
< "Etienne Jules Adolph Desmier, vicomte d'Archiac," in which "vicomte
< d'Archiac" is NOT part of his name, only "Etienne Jules Adolph Desmier"
< is.
< 
< <<P. De Malpas Grey Egerton  13 Nov 1806 - 6 April 1881>>
<  
< <Uh... how many surnames? Two? ~:-|>
< 
<   Some cultures may have more than one. In Mexico, it is common for men
< and women to bear both their maternal and paternal names. However, this
< name is "Philip de Malpas Grey-Egerton."
< 
< <Agassiz.>
< 
< Jean Luis Rodolphe Agass?z....
< 
< <<Joseph Le Conte 1823 - 1901>>
< 
< <Not Comte?>
< 
<   Nope. Actually, "LeComte" in my sources.
< 
< <<Eudes Deslongchamps  1830 - 1895 (89)>>
< 
< <Eudes-Deslongchamps is the surname.>
< 
<   Joseph Armand Eudes-Deslongchamps.
< 
< <And the rest of the dynasty?>
< 
<   Louis S. B. Leakey [Aug. 7, 1903 - Oct. 1, 1972]
< 
<   Most everyone else in the family involved in paleo is still around.
< 
< <<Eugenii A. Maleev  1915 - 1966>>
< 
< <Not u, v. (We could waffle endlessly about the rest of the spelling, but 
< this is definite.)>
< 
<   Eh ... so is using the proper spelling for all of it: Yevgeny
< Aleksandrovich Maleyev. In Russian, "ye" is usually soft (and approximates
< "e") unless 1) at beginning of a word, 2) at end of a word, or 3)
< following another vowel. There are some transcriptors that ignore the "y"
< sound altogether,and ignore that there are two different letters
< representing "ee" and "yeh/eh." For instance, Evolutsii does not use the
< "E" character, but the rounded "backwards" "E."
< 
<   Cheers,
< 
< =====
< Jaime A. Headden
< 
<   Little steps are often the hardest to take.  We are too used to making 
leaps in the face of adversity, that a simple skip is so hard to do.  We should 
all learn to walk soft, walk small, see the world around us rather than zoom by 
it.
< 
< "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)

Hey - I included Darwin, A. S. Wallace and Meyer to my list! I have a certain 
problems with an e-mail provider recently. I already wrote some notes to HP 
Marjanovic's reply, but don't know if it was actually sent (nah, system error). 
Well, my response to the critique is at lest that I was half-sleeping while 
making the list ;o)

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