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RE: Antorbital fenestra



The antorbital fenestra houses an air sac in all archosaurs. See Witmer 1997
for *the* paper on the antorbital fenestra. Muscles have little, if
anything, to do with the fenestra.

WITMER, L. M. 1997. The evolution of the antorbital cavity of archosaurs: a
study in soft-tissue reconstruction in the fossil record with an analysis of
the function of pneumaticity. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir,
3:1-73.

Andy 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu] On Behalf Of
> Kent Caldwell
> Sent: Friday, November 26, 2004 10:37 AM
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: re: Antorbital fenestra
> 
> oops - actually, that was my answer. Whenever I think
> of anorbital fenestra, I automatically think of the
> big, modified ones possessed by theropods; I did not
> even consider its function in other archosaurs.
> 
> Kent Caldwell
> 
> --- David Peters <davidrpeters@earthlink.net> wrote:
> 
> > apologies if this has already been answered. I'm an
> > archive reader.
> >
> > The answer goes back to before there were theropods,
> > because the
> > theropods inherited this character from croc-like
> > proterosuchids and
> > their intermediaries.
> >
> > Still Grant's answer may apply.
> >
> > dp
> > stl
> >
> >
> > For some time now there has been wide consensus that
> > the anorbital fenestra lightened the skull of
> > theropods without sacrificing strength and also
> > increased the area for muscle attachment & may have
> > added to those muscles' efficiency by giving them
> > more
> > room to flex.
> >
> > --- Amtoine Grant <ajgrant@eastlink.ca> wrote:
> >
> >