[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Driving the Hi-Line (Re: FW a notice for a dummy :-)))



The "Hi-Line" (alternative spelled "High Line") is U.S. Hiway 2, the
portion of the route from Browning Montana into North Dakota.  It is a
two lane paved highway, and IMHO it has more charm than the famous
two-laner, Route 66.  The Hi-Line is the northern E-W route through
Montana, and it follows the old railroad right of way.  The history of
Sternberg dinosaur collecting parallels the history of the Hi-Line.

PHIL'S ABRIDGED GUIDE TO THE HI-LINE

Driving east, from the Idaho-ho border:
Browning, MT is on the Blackfoot Indian Reservation and it is the home of
the Blackfeet Museum of the Northern Plains Indian (a GREAT museum).  The
town of Browning is a little shoddy (as are many poverty stricken native
American reservations in the U.S.).  The bedrock around Browning is Early
Cretaceous marine sandstone and mudstone.  Next on the route is Cutbank,
MT, a quaint little town (the rocks in the canyon that you see driving
into town from the west are part of the Two Medicine Formation (of John
Horner's "Egg Mountain" fame) ).  Next is Shelby, MT, a great place to
stay overnight.  Nice looking old stone and brick buildings in the city
core.  East of Shelby is Chester, MT, IMHO not as nice, but the
surrounding bedrock (in the few places that it is exposed) is Judith
River Formation.  To the east of Chester is the town of Havre, MT.  Havre
is a bigger (but still tiny) town.  It is nice and has a lot of friendly
folks.  The surrounding bedrock is also the Judith River Fm.  East of
Havre is the tiny town of Malta, which is the home of the Philips County
Museum (mainly displaying dinosaur-related theme).

The intersection of the Hi-Line with Hiway 24 occurs in Glasgow, MT. 
Hiway 24 takes you southward into Hell Creek Formation territory (latest
Cretaceous), the scene of many of Barnum Brown's amazing discoveries 100
years ago.

I have found that driving the Hi-Line is a spiritual experience (and I
usually don't consider myself to be a spiritual person).  Along much of
the route, your car radio will be able to receive a native American radio
station, which plays a lot of modern "fusion" First Nations music.  The
music helps get me in the mood while I'm driving.  Unfortunately, I can't
remember the station's call sign.  I think it is a nationally-aired
station, bounced off of local repeaters in the state.

<pb>
--


On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 15:18:21 -0600 Cliff Green <dinonaut@emerytelcom.net>
writes:
> Dear Phil and List,
> 
>     OK, you got me. Just where the heck is " The High Line. " I've 
> never
> heard of it. I am traveling to the Black Hills to Deliver a very 
> late full
> scale Pteranodon sculpture in June. Is it around that area?
> 
>     More Summer fun Cliff
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Phil Bigelow" <bigelowp@juno.com>
> To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> Sent: Sunday, April 17, 2005 4:45 AM
> Subject: Re: FW a notice for a dummy :-))
> 
> 
> > I can't answer Mary's question, but on one of my many summer trips 
> along
> > the Hi-Line, I finally was worn down by the museum's advertising 
> sign so
> > I stopped in.
> >
> > The building is rather small, and there isn't a lot of room for 
> displays,
> > but what they had up was interesting.  The admission price was
> > $5.00/person (1990s-pricing).  Not expensive admission, but not 
> cheap
> > either, because you can see everything in about 15 minutes.  When 
> I was
> > there, the dino mummy hadn't been collected yet.
> >
> > BTW: For anyone interested in experiencing small town Americana, 
> driving
> > the Hi-Line is worth it.  The towns have remained largely 
> unchanged since
> > the 1960s ("unchanged" in the good sense).  Watching the blazing 
> summer
> > sun come up while I was eating pancakes, ham, and coffee in a 
> 1940's
> > brick diner in downtown Havre is one of my fond memories.
> >
> > <pb>
> > -- 
> >
> > On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 12:30:12 -0400 (EDT) MKIRKALDY@aol.com 
> writes:
> > > In a message dated 4/15/2005 9:24:01 PM Eastern  Standard Time,
> > > Danvarner@aol.com writes:
> > > The newspaper story   states:
> > >
> > > << "I'm a scientist, first and foremost," said Nate  Murphy,  
> the
> > > Malta
> > > paleontologist who helped find Leonardo and  publicly unveiled 
> him
> > > to great
> > > fanfare in 2002. "A specimen like Leonardo,  he's  our marquis
> > > specimen and
> > > deserves to be studied. I am getting  all  sorts of pressure 
> from
> > > museums around  the
> > > country to let them  take him  and do the research. They've got 
> deep
> > > pockets,
> > > but once you  give a  specimen to another institution, it's hard 
> to
> > > get him
> > > back."   >>
> > >
> > > < Who are these deep-pocketed museums  around the   country so
> > > willing to
> > > snatch Leonardo from his rightful  home? America  wants to  
> know!
> > > And so do I
> > > because I've never met a  museum with deep  pockets or even  
> shallow
> > > ones for
> > > that matter. Signed,  DV, a marquis  specimen in his own  
> right.>
> > >
> > > Who actually owns Leonardo and the other finds in the Judith 
> River
> > > Dinosaur
> > > Institute/Phillips County Museum?  Mr. Murphy is also listed as 
> the
> > > new
> > > curator of the Makoshika Dinosaur Museum.
> > >
> > > Mary
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
>