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RE: Great blue heron - Pterosaurs



So when the crested ptero's flew, what was the
probable angle of the crest relative to the ground?
45?? Any consensus or front running theories on crest
function?

--- "Mikko K. Haaramo" <mikko.haaramo@helsinki.fi>
wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> No, their neck vertebrae were much longer and fewer
> in number, also the
> joint-structure differs, resampling more typical
> amniote vertebrae, unlike
> birds saddle-shaped vertebrae.
> 
> --Mikko Haaramo
> 
>
********************************************************************
> 
> Mikko K. Haaramo, M.Sc.
> 
> Paleontologist & IT-Manager
> 
> Department of Geology
> P.O.Box 64 (Gustaf Hällströminkatu 2)
> FIN-00014  University of Helsinki
> 
> sposti: mailto:mikko.haaramo@helsinki.fi
> www: Mikko's Phylogeny Archive
> [http://www.fmnh.helsinki.fi/users/haaramo/]
> 
>
********************************************************************
>  
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-vrtpaleo@usc.edu
> [mailto:owner-vrtpaleo@usc.edu] On Behalf Of
> RTB
> Sent: 25. huhtikuuta 2005 5:51
> To: vrtpaleo@usc.edu
> Subject: Great blue heron - Pterosaurs
> 
> Great blue heron - Pterosaurs
> 
> Did the longer necked pterosaurs assume the same
> tight 'S' neck posture that
> the Great blue heron (Ardea herodias) does in
> flight?
> 
> R
> 
>