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RE: ecoinheritance



Sorry Dora, but this was not a very helpful or meaningful email.  I am
willing to hear you out provided you have something substantial to say,
not telling us you don't know. 

Kenneth Carpenter, Ph.D. 
Curator of Lower Vertebrate Paleontology 
and Chief Preparator 
Department of Earth Sciences 
Denver Museum of Nature & Science 
2001 Colorado Blvd. 
Denver, CO 80205 USA

ph: 303-370-6392/ or 6403 
fx: 303-331-6492 


 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu] 
> On Behalf Of Dora Smith
> Sent: Saturday, January 22, 2005 6:59 PM
> To: birdbooker@zipcon.net; dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: ecoinheritance
> 
> I've heard of such a concept, and it isn't called 
> ecoinheritance - but I'm darned if I can remember what the word is.
> 
> Yours,
> Dora Smith
> Austin, Texas
> villandra@austin.rr.com
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ian Paulsen" <birdbooker@zipcon.net>
> To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> Cc: <tweeters@u.washington.edu>; <neoorn-l@lsu.edu>; 
> <vrtpaleo@usc.edu>
> Sent: Saturday, January 22, 2005 2:03 PM
> Subject: ecoinheritance
> 
> 
> > HI:
> >  I was trying to come up with a term that describes the 
> natural world 
> > a species or an individual of a species receives from the previous 
> > generation or species. The term I came up with is 
> ecoinheritance. Has 
> > anyone heard of a similar concept and what is it called?
> >
> > --
> > Ian Paulsen
> > Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
> > A.K.A.: "Birdbooker"
> > "Rallidae all the way!"
> 
>