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Phorusrhacos



Well,

If anyone is interested, a non black and white
all-singing and dancing CGI Phorusrhacos will be
making its way onto a screen near you in the
not-that-distant future.

We toyed with the idea of a burian-style black/grey
and white colour scheme (which is pretty close to
seriemas), but went for something a bit more exciting.

Ours has an orange eye, although i wanted blue!

:(

Denver.

--- Mike Taylor <mike@miketaylor.org.uk> wrote:

> Unbelievable.  There is just no stopping him.  Am I
> imagining it, or
> has Darren's contribution to the DML actually
> _increased_ since he
> unsubscribed?
> 
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> Envelope-to: mike@miketaylor.org.uk
> Delivery-date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 01:17:43 +0200
> From: "Toni" <toni.naish@btinternet.com>
> To: "Mike Taylor" <mike@miketaylor.org.uk>
> Subject: Burian's Phorusrhacos
> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 00:26:39 +0100
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> 
> Hey Mike - here's another one for DML (thanks). Will
> respond to your email on Tigger Mamum-Ra,
> temnospondyl phylogeny and 'The path of least
> resistance' within the next hour or so. 
> 
> 
> 
> - ----------------------------------------
> 
> A couple of things in response to Dan's words on
> restorations of _Phorusrhacos_. Thanks again for
> your comments Dan - and I agree with you, it was
> Knight that inspired so many, including Burian, but
> (as was my original point) it was Burian's painting
> that became so influential post-1960s, most notably
> in the colour scheme that has so often been used for
> this bird. And I did always wonder about that
> freakish pseudo-lamb creature in the creature's
> talons. 
> 
>  
> 
> Burian's colour painting, in my opinion, is just
> awesome, and one of my favourite renditions of any
> prehistoric animal. And I think (though can't back
> this up) that Burian was depicting some speculative
> palaeobehaviour in that painting: the bird on the
> left appears smaller, and appears to be both
> presenting the litoptern corpse to the larger bird,
> and engaging in an open-winged display. Based on
> raptor behaviour, I think that we're seeing
> courtship feeding, with the male engaging in a
> nuptial display. As is the case in raptors, Burian
> seems to have speculated that male phorusrhacoids
> were smaller than females: as it happens, some
> phorusrhacoids (including _Titanis walleri_,
> _Brontornis burmeisteri_ and various psilopterines)
> do exhibit a significant amount of intra-specific
> size variation, so apparently did exhibit sexual
> dimorphism in size. Given that phorusrhacoids were
> hypercarnivorous, it might be tempting to imagine
> that they exhibited 'reverse' sexual dimorphism as
> owl!
> s and
>  raptors do, BUT in extant gruiforms (including
> seriemas - the closest relatives and analogues of
> phorusrhacoids) it's the males that are bigger.
> Furthermore some studies indicate that 'reverse'
> dimorphism mostly occurs in birds that pursue other
> birds in flight (Chris Brochu alluded to this in the
> FMNH PR2081 monograph), though there are exceptions.
> 
>  
> 
> - ----------------------------------------
> 
> In fact this was firmly cemented by Ray Harryhausen
> using  essentially 
> Burian's design as an animation model in "Mysterious
> Island"(a  beautiful detail 
> being having the model rigged so the crest would
> elevate,  showing  
> aggitation):
> 
> - ----------------------------------------
> 
>  
> 
> It's an apparently sad fact that only us nerdy
> palaeofreaks really appreciate the identity of the
> bird in 'Mysterious Island': Karl Shuker (1991)
> reported that 'the novelty value of using a
> _Phorusrhacus_ [sic] adversary . was lost on the
> film audiences of the time - they simply thought
> that it was a giant chicken!' (p. 121). Note also
> that _Phorusrhacos_ made a brief appearance in
> Conan-Doyle's _The Lost World_ - it pursues
> Challenger and is shot dead by Roxton.
> 
>  
> 
> - ----------------------------------------
> 
> Funny Darren should mention Maurice Wilson as I was
> thinking of him also. 
> His work was absolutely original. It seemed as if he
> never looked at anyone 
> else's art. Hopefully, someday his art will be
> rediscovered and fully 
> appreciated. DV
> 
> - ----------------------------------------
> 
>  
> 
> I began collecting biographical material some time
> ago, though this is something most decidedly on the
> back-burner. 
> 
>  
> 
> Ref  - -
> 
>  
> 
> Shuker, K. P. N. 1991. _Extraordinary Animals
> Worldwide_. Robert Hale (London), pp. 208.
> 
>  
> 
> - -- 
> Darren Naish
> School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
> Burnaby Building, Burnaby Rd
> University of Portsmouth
> Portsmouth, UK, PO1 3QL
> 
> email: darren.naish@port.ac.uk
> [send large attachments to: eotyrannus@gmail.com]
> tel: 023 92846045
> 
> 
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