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RE: Tyrannosaur stuff




Tom Holtz wrote:

>Tracy Ford wrapped things up with a review of the tyrannosauroid record

>through time. While I don't agree with all his taxonomy or systematics 
>(i.e., the inclusion of Iliosuchus or Siamotyrannus in
Tyrannosauroidea), 
>he did show that tyrants spent most of their
>history as small-bodied critters.

>This is interesting, given that there is currently no evidence that the

>small-bodied tyrannosauroids survived into the Late Cretaceous (unless 
>_Itemirus_ is a tyrannosauroid - and even this critter lived much
earlier 
>than the big-ass tyrannosaurids of the Campano-Maastrichtian).  Late 
>Cretaceous dromaeosaurs, by contrast, came in all sizes.

Tracy rambled so much that he never got to the Late Cretaceous. Tom was
referring to older taxa that Tracy was referring to. There really was
nothing new by Tracy, it was sort of like a "book report".

Ken

Kenneth Carpenter, Ph.D.
Curator of Lower Vertebrate Paleontology/Chief Preparator
Department of Earth Sciences
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
2001 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO 80205
 
Phone: 303-370-6392
Fax: 303-331-6492
************************************************************
for PDFs of some of my publications, as well as information of the Cedar
Mountain Project: 
https://scientists.dmns.org/sites/kencarpenter/default.aspx
-----Original Message-----
From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu] On Behalf
Of Tim Williams
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2005 10:41 AM
To: dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: Tyrannosaur stuff


Ken Carpenter wrote:

>It may very well be that Tany was previously named, so offer your
evidence.

Currently there is no evidence - I got nuttin'.  There is no reason to 
believe that there was not more than one Morrison tyrannosauroid: Tany
and 
Stokesy.  In fact, there may have been several tyrannosauroids scooting 
around North America during the Late Jurassic, especially if (a) the 
tyrannosaurid/itemirid-like braincase from CLDQ that was (provisionally)

referred to _Stokesosaurus_ represents a new taxon; and/or (b) the 
_Stokesosaurus_-like ilium from South Dakota comes from another taxon
(maybe 
_Aviatyrannis_).  I was just reiterating the possibility that 
_Tanycolagreus_ and _Stokesosaurus_ *might* be the same (which, 
incidentally, would give a very decent skeleton); I was in no way
endorsing 
the suggestion.

>Personal opinion (contrary to what Bakker may think) is not scientific 
>fact.  ;-)

What??!!  Now you tell me!!!

Tom Holtz wrote:

>Tracy Ford wrapped things up with a review of the tyrannosauroid record

>through time. While I don't agree with all his taxonomy or systematics 
>(i.e., the inclusion of Iliosuchus or Siamotyrannus in
Tyrannosauroidea), 
>he did show that tyrants spent most of their
>history as small-bodied critters.

This is interesting, given that there is currently no evidence that the 
small-bodied tyrannosauroids survived into the Late Cretaceous (unless 
_Itemirus_ is a tyrannosauroid - and even this critter lived much
earlier 
than the big-ass tyrannosaurids of the Campano-Maastrichtian).  Late 
Cretaceous dromaeosaurs, by contrast, came in all sizes.

Cheers

Tim