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RE: Guanlong wucaii (was RE: Early Version of T. Rex Is Discovered)



"since when do animals make bellowing noises through their nose"

Elephant seals and elephants do.


From: Ken.Carpenter@dmns.org
Reply-To: Ken.Carpenter@dmns.org
To: blackphoenix@eastlink.ca, dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: RE: Guanlong wucaii (was RE: Early Version of T. Rex Is Discovered)
Date: Thu, 09 Feb 2006 13:28:38 -0700


You took my comment waaaaaaaay to serious. I was making fun of the
resonanting chamber hypothesis of lamberosaurs (since when do animals
make bellowing noises through their nose????) AND Jack Horner's
scavenging hypothesis.


Kenneth Carpenter, Ph.D. Curator of Lower Vertebrate Paleontology/ Chief Preparator Department of Earth Sciences Denver Museum of Nature & Science 2001 Colorado Blvd. Denver, CO 80205

Phone: 303-370-6392
Fax: 303-331-6492
************************************************************
for PDFs of some of my publications, as well as information of the Cedar
Mountain Project:
https://scientists.dmns.org/sites/kencarpenter/default.aspx

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu] On Behalf
Of Amtoine Grant
Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 12:50 PM
To: dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Guanlong wucaii (was RE: Early Version of T. Rex Is
Discovered)

On Thursday, February 9, 2006, at 01:05  PM, Ken.Carpenter@dmns.org
wrote:

> The crest obviously is a resonating chamber like lambeosaurs to call
> other scavengers to dinner - ;-)


Seemingly illogical given that that would only mean less food for the 'calling' individual. Vultures & bald eagles, for example, don't summon each other AND they often squabble and/or fight . HOWEVER, it would make sense if that when groups were assembled they would cooperate in defense of themselves & the carcass from the [at that time larger representatives of] other predaceous theropods of the time. This would also be a good starting point for the socialization that certain assemblages of tyrannosaurid fossils represent. Besides the obvious social implications of a head-borne crest that works directly against predation. . .