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Sue--the unknown story



Storm Lake Pilot Tribune 2006
"Australian consultant talks up development for small communities"
By Michael Tidemann, Pilot Tribune Staff, January 10, 2006

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=15900263&BRD=1304&PAG=461&dept_
id=180486&rfi=6

"An Australian community development consultant laid out a game plan for success for small towns Thursday at Buena Vista University in a conference for northwest Iowa Iowa State University Extension staff. David Beurle, from Melbourne, Australia, was the keynote speaker at the Anchors Away conference attended by 120 ISU Extension staff."

<snip of descriptions of small town development>

"Telecommuting, once the stuff of science fiction, has now become the norm for some occupations. In one instance, people from Seattle, Wash., came to North Dakota to start a dinosaur museum. The reason was simple. North Dakota has a plethora of dinosaur fossils in one particular area to the extent that they're poking out from the hillsides."
North Dakota also has a lot of Federal land.


< The company Beurle cited started a bidding war between two major corporations for a complete tyrannosaurus rex skeleton - one piece at a time. The final bid came to $8 million.>
I talked to the reporter and asked which company and which corporations, and they were going to part out what was obviously Sue? He said that's what Beurle said, and that he didn't have any more information other than what was in the article. I told him that McDonalds, Disney, the California State University system and private individuals joined together to buy Sue at auction, competing against other museums. Someone could have probably sold Sue one piece at a time, in a reverse Gestalt method, but what connection would Beurle have with this? And a "company" manipulated the hype and bidding war for Sue?


Mary