[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

RE: Diceratops



    <My apologies if this message appears twice, I tried to send it
earlier but seem to have failed)>
    Is the journal _Gaia_, which _Rebbachisaurus_ was apparently
described in, covered by the Zoological Record? I don't know if the
website can be relied upon for names not published in ZR-covered
sources, as that was probably the main source used. Apparently, the
website was compiled by transcribing the original print edition (in nine
volumes) of Nomenclator Zoologicus, which covered 1758 to 1994. Later,
an online-only 'volume 10' was added, which covered 1994 to 2004. Names
later than 2004 are not yet covered (which excludes _Mei_, sorry Jaime).
The website background info contains no indication of whether another
volume(s) is being compiled (I certainly hope so). Nor, unfortunately,
could I find any contact details for notifying omissions.
    On a similar note, the latest (16 December, 2005) issue of the
_Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature_ contains a proposal for compulsory
registration of new names that gets my attention as probably the best
suggestion to date for making this into more than a 'great on paper'
(i.e. not so great in practical application) idea, which has been my
major concern with the idea of registration to date. Basically,
authors/publishers/interested parties get two years after publication to
register the name, which then dates from the time of original
publication for priority. If registered more than two years after
publication, the name dates from time of registration, though it may be
dated from original publication if it can be demonstrated that external
forces interfered with registration (such as mailing difficulties, death
of author, etc.) Names published before 2008 (or whenever the proposal
comes into force) retain validity from original date of publication and
do not need to be registered, though it is hoped that the register will
be expanded to record all such names. Go to www.iczn.org and click on
'General Articles' for the Bulletin to read the full text. You'll have
to scroll down - the same issue includes two truly dire proposals for
extending the ICZN to cover suprafamilial taxa. The first of these would
even require typified names at all ranks with standardised endings. As
an arachnologist myself, I'm still reeling with horror from seeing
Ricinulei renamed 'Poliocheriformes', Palpigradi as 'Eukoeneniiformes'
and Cheliceromorpha as 'Scorpionozoi'. This system would probably make
Vertebrata into 'Hominozoi'... eep!

   Cheers,

        Christopher Taylor

-----Original Message-----
From: Nick Pharris [mailto:npharris@umich.edu] 
Sent: Friday, 13 January 2006 11:19 AM
To: gerarus@westnet.com.au
Cc: dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: RE: Diceratops

Quoting Christopher Taylor <gerarus@westnet.com.au>:

>    Nomenclator Zoologicus (http://uio.mbl.edu/NomenclatorZoologicus/)
> confirms the homonymy, and indicates said homonymy as unresolved
[Aside:
> I was directed to this website about a week ago, and it's a fantastic
> resource.

Very cool.  I tried a few dino names, and _Rebbachisaurus_, oddly 
enough, isn't in there...

Nick Pharris
Department of Linguistics
University of Michigan

-- 
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.17/228 - Release Date:
12/01/2006
 

-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.17/228 - Release Date:
12/01/2006
 

-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.17/228 - Release Date:
12/01/2006