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Re: Even more last papers for 2005




The Abstracts are as follows:

Senter, P. (2005). Phylogenetic taxonomy and the names of the major archosaurian (Reptilia) clades . PaleoBios 25: 1-7.

Abstract: "Much disagreement exists as to what names to apply to the major clades of the reptilian taxon Archosauria. Even among practitioners of phylogenetic taxonomy, there has been a tendency to apply the principles of phylogenetic taxonomy to the naming of some archosaurian clades while resisting the principles of phylogenetic taxonomy for other clades. Here, the principles of phylogenetic taxonomy are applied to the major clades of Archosauria, and the correct names for these clades within the paradigm of phylogenetic taxonomy are delineated. Within this paradigm, the names of the major archosaurian clades are as follows. Archosauria: the most exclusive clade containing Crocodylia and Aves. Archosauriformes: the most exclusive clade containing _Proterosuchus_ and Archosauria. Pseudosuchia: the most inclusive clade within Archosauria that includes Crocodylia but not Aves. Crurotarsi: the most exclusive clade containing Parasuchia, Ornithosuchidae, _Prestosuchus_, and Suchia. Ornithosuchia: the most inclusive clade within Archosauria that includes Aves but not Crocodylia. Ornithodira: the most exclusive clade containing Pterosauria, _Scleromochlus_ and Dinosauromorpha. Avialae: the most inclusive clade containing ornithuran birds but not deinonychosaurian theropods. Aves: the most exclusive clade containing _Archaeopteryx_ and extant birds. Neornithes: the most exclusive and extant birds. [sic]"

I have to say I'm a little underwhelmed by some of these definitions. I especially hate the definition of Pseudosuchia. I think Sereno is dead right when he threw Pseudosuchia on the dung heap. Worst of all, Pseudosuchia is defined by Senter to include crocodylians. So, let me get this straight... Pseudosuchia, which means "false crocodiles", now includes crocodiles. Terrific.


Senter, P. and Parrish, J.M. (2005). Functional analysis of the hands of the theropod dinosaur _Chirostenotes pergracilis_: evidence for an unusual paleoecological role. PaleoBios 25: 9-19.


Abstract: "We report the first functional study of the forelimbs of an oviraptorosaurian dinosaur. The diet of these typically toothless dinosaurs has long been a mystery. The hands of the Late Cretaceous North American oviraptorosaur _Chirostenotes pergracilis_ exhibit a greatly elongated second digit with an unusually straight ungual, the functional significance of which has not previously been explored. Direct manipulation of the manual skeleton of _C. pergracilis_ and comparison with other theropods reveals that the range of motion in its hands is not greatly modified from the plesiomorphic maniraptoran condition. From this we infer that the significance of the modified second finger of _Chirostenotes_ is unrelated to functions that would have required a change in manual range of motion and is instead related to some function requiring one finger to be much longer than the others. Comparison with the anatomical requirements for a variety of manual functions shows that the modification of digit II in _Chirostenotes_ possibly is related to the probing of crevices to apprehend prey. Such prey would have to be soft-bodied enough to impale and extract, small enough to extract with one claw, and large and/or abundant enough to sustain a predator with a manual modification that suggests specialization for said prey. The morphology of and range of motion in the hand of _Chirostenotes_ are also compatible with a hooking function but not with digging or one-handed prehension."

This last sentence, especially the lack of "one-handed prehension", reminds me of Gishlick's biomechanical work on _Deinonychus_.

Cheers

Tim


From: Jay <sappororaptor@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: sappororaptor@yahoo.com
To: DML <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Even more last papers for 2005
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 02:35:26 -0800 (PST)

And more (if these have not yet mentioned):

PaleoBios CURRENT ISSUE
25(3), December 23, 2005

SENTER, P. Phylogenetic taxonomy and the names of the major archosaurian (Reptilia) clades.
PaleoBios, v. 25, n. 2, p. 1-7.


SENTER, P. and PARRISH, J.M. Functional analysis of the hands of the theropod dinosaur
Chirostenotes pergracilis: evidence for an unusual paleoecological role. PaleoBios, v. 25, n. 2,
p. 9-19.