[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: The (long) future of paleontology



I don't know the situation in paleontology, but in the geosciences, many
PhD candidates who have finished their coursework and are writing their
dissertation are already employed full-time as geoscientists.
I currently have 3 friends who are "finishing up" their dissertations
while simultaneously working full time in their chosen profession. 
Needless to say, holding down a full time job slows down the dissertation
rewrite process.  One of them, now employed as a geophysicist, is under
an official deadline (and he is MAJORLY stressed out because of it),
while the other two, who are employed full time as geologists, have no
official school deadline.

But it is true that many grad students are not willing to "leave the
nest", and some students can get quite creative at avoiding flapping
their wings.  Some who have already graduated use Post-doc positions as a
way to postpone the inevitable.  And some who have received their PhDs
opt to stay at their alma mater as 101 lecturers, rather than competing
for a position as a full Professor.

<pb>
--


On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 11:46:05 -0700 Ken.Carpenter@dmns.org writes:
> What Phil wrote is only partially true. I was at a university that 
> made the transition between a loosely held time limit and a rigid, 
> official one. The change was because of a growing number of 
> "professional students", meaning that they got so comfortable being 
> students that the thought of finishing and having to look for a job 
> (hence "grow-up") was difficult for them. I know of at least one 
> graduate student at the U. of California Berkeley who had already 
> been a graduate student for 20 years when I met the person in the 
> late 1970s. The rigid deadlines became a way of forcing students to 
> finish something they started and to move on in life. 
> Ken
> 
> 
> Kenneth Carpenter, Ph.D.
> Curator of Lower Vertebrate Paleontology/
> Chief Preparator
> Department of Earth Sciences
> Denver Museum of Nature & Science
> 2001 Colorado Blvd.
> Denver, CO 80205
>  
> Phone: 303-370-6392
> Fax: 303-331-6492
> ************************************************************
> for PDFs of some of my publications, as well as information of the 
> Cedar Mountain Project: 
> https://scientists.dmns.org/sites/kencarpenter/default.aspx
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu [mailto:owner-dinosaur@usc.edu] On 
> Behalf Of Phil Bigelow
> Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2006 11:32 AM
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: The (long) future of paleontology
> 
> 
> Some U.S. universities place a time limit on graduate programs.  
> Other U.S. universities don't.
> 
> So why should a university care how long it takes a student to 
> finish? 
> IMHO, the university's impetus is a financial one.  If a student has 
> finished his/her course work, and is writing the thesis and is 
> signing up for only a couple "thesis/dissertation" credits per 
> quarter, then he/she is paying the university only a small amount of 
> money.
> 
> In contrast, a brand-spanking-new Masters/PhD student is usually 
> taking a full course load at the university.  Hence the university 
> makes more money off of the new student.
> 
> In order to increase the efficiency of the "get 'em in - push 'em 
> out"
> style of graduate education, some U.S. universities have implemented 
> what is called a "No Thesis Masters degree" option.  It involves 
> only a couple years of course work, no research, no written thesis, 
> and no resulting professional publication.
> 
> The grad student loses out on what could have been a good education, 
> while the university gets newer students (along with their full 
> course load tuition payments) into the department quicker.
> 
> I certainly hope that this post didn't reveal my bias on the matter. 
>  ;-)
> 
> <pb>
> --
> 
> On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 13:38:45 +0100 Thomas de Wilde 
> <thomas@dinoforum.net>
> writes:
> > Doesn't a License/master's thesis always have a deadline, they do 
> in 
> > Belgium, and I find that rather logical, as they have to be 
> finished 
> > within that year, since most people tend to leave university the 
> year 
> > after the last year
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "David Marjanovic" <david.marjanovic@gmx.at>
> > To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> > Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2006 1:19 PM
> > Subject: RE: The (long) future of paleontology
> > 
> > 
> > > > --- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
> > > > Von: Ken.Carpenter@dmns.org
> > > > Datum: Mon, 16 Jan 2006 20:54:35 -0700
> > >
> > > > But then when the ultimate deadline of submission of a written
> > thesis is
> > > > hanging overhead, reality sets in, and suddenly the thesis 
> topic
> > is
> > > > smaller than the original proposal. Where did all the time go?
> > >
> > > Deadline?
> > >
> > > Are there deadlines on dissertations in the USA? If so, my
> > decision to
> > > write mine in France (where I get everything organized for me) 
> was
> > better
> > > than I thought, even though it'll be about placodonts and maybe
> > some
> > > general sauropsid phylogeny (for simple lack of dinosaurs
> > <sniff>)!
> > >
> > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > From: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu on behalf of Andrew A. Farke
> > > > Sent: Mon 1/16/2006 7:24 PM
> > >
> > > > Let someone else do the phylogeny--I'll just use it as context
> > for my
> > > > funky morph work.
> > > > ;-)
> > >
> > > And _then_ comes _evolutionary functional morphology_! HARR HARR! 
> 
> > =8-)
> > >
> > > --
> > > Lust, ein paar Euro nebenbei zu verdienen? Ohne Kosten, ohne
> > Risiko!
> > > Satte Provisionen für GMX Partner: 
> > http://www.gmx.net/de/go/partner
> > 
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> --
> "Am I crazy, Jerry?  Am I?  Or, I am SO sane that you just blew your 
> mind?!" - Kramer
> 
> 
> 
> 


--
"Am I crazy, Jerry?  Am I?  Or, I am SO sane that you just blew your
mind?!" - Kramer