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Re: Sauropod ONP...and energetics



But ratites have necks that are just long enough to reach the ground in a tiny little arc, exactly what you would expect (energetically) from a primary grazer. Regardless of neck posture, Camarasaurus is a better model for a grazing dinosaur than diplodocids are (although the neck is still too long). Dicreaosaurs are what a primary grazing diplodocoid should look like (Brachytrachelopan any one?). If diplodocids where primary grazers, we need to explain why they don't all look like dicraeosaurs.

As for reachinginto forests (different post) ...why not just rear up then? You would be able to exloit a far more effective browsing envelope than sticking your neck into dense forest from the periphery, where the trees would prevent you from lateral excursion of the neck.

Scott Hartman
Science Director
Wyoming Dinosaur Center
110 Carter Ranch Rd.
Thermopolis, WY 82443
(800) 455-3466 ext. 230
Cell: (307) 921-8333

www.skeletaldrawing.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Guy Leahy <xrciseguy@sbcglobal.net>
To: dinosaur@usc.edu
Cc: dinoboygraphics@aol.com
Sent: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 16:18:52 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Sauropod ONP...and energetics

Playing Devil's Advocate for a moment, ostriches,
rheas and emus all have long necks, and all are
primarily grazers... :-)  In addition, cassowary diets
consist in large part of fruit which has fallen to the
forest floor.  Even if sauropods fed primarily from
shoulder height, this would still mean foraging at 2-3
meters above ground level, with some tall-shouldered
taxa(brachiosaurs) feeding at still higher levels.

Guy Leahy

--- dinoboygraphics@aol.com wrote:

Please, someone, explain how on earth a long neck is of benefit to any grazer/low browser?



Scott Hartman
Science Director
Wyoming Dinosaur Center
110 Carter Ranch Rd.
Thermopolis, WY 82443
(408) 483-9284

www.skeletaldrawing.com