[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

RE: When carnivores kill other carnivores...



Guy Leahy wrote-

Off the top of my head, I can't think of too many
dinosaur faunas which include two big theropods of
approximately equal size (Albertosaurus/Daspletosaurus
does come to mind.)  Are there any other examples?

Inferior Oolite- Magnosaurus "Walkersaurus"

Stonesfield Slate-
Megalosaurus
unnamed (?)abelisaur

Calcaire de Caen-
Poekilopleuron
Dubreillosaurus

Lower Shaximiao-
"Szechuanoraptor"
Xuanhanosaurus
Kaijiangosaurus
Gasosaurus

Morrison-
Ceratosaurus
Torvosaurus
Allosaurus
Saurophaganax
Marshosaurus
Tanycolagreus

Upper Shaximiao-
Sinraptor
Yangchuanosaurus

Tendaguru-
"Allosaurus" tengagurensis
Ceratosaurus

Wessex-
Neovenator
Baryonyx

Sau Khua-
Siamosaurus
Siamotyrannus

Lameta-
Coeluroides/Jubbulpuria
Indosuchus/Indosaurus
Rajasaurus

Candelaros-
Ekrixinatosaurus
Giganotosaurus

Huincul-
Ilokelesia
undescribed carcharodontosaurid

Anacleto-
Abelisaurus
Aucasaurus
undescribed carcharodontosaurid

Kem-Kem-
Deltadromeus
Carcharodontosaurus
Spinosaurus

Baharija-
Bahariasaurus
Carcharodontosaurus
Spinosaurus

I think it was probably the norm to have multiple large theropod species in the kinds of environments which preserve fossils. The exception being Maastrichtian Western North America and Campanian-Maastrichtian Asia, which seem to only have single species of tyrannosaurine (unless you include omnivorous/herbivorous taxa).

Mickey Mortimer