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Re: Question about Archaeopteryx's (non) reversed hallux



Actually, not only do other theropods lack a retroverted hallux, but so do dromaeosaurs, Archaeopteryx, and basal-most birds. Birds with retroverte hallices must modify the development of their first metatarsal, literally twisting it so that the functional toe can point backwards. This leaves a characteristic twist (torsion) that can be fairly easily identified in fossils. Archaeopteryx and all dromaeosaurs lack this (along with all non-avian theropods) and hence none of them have a reversed hallux.


Scott Hartman Science Director Wyoming Dinosaur Center 110 Carter Ranch Rd. Thermopolis, WY 82443 (800) 455-3466 ext. 230 Cell: (307) 921-8333

www.skeletaldrawing.com

-----Original Message-----
From: soixmoi@gmail.com
To: DINOSAUR@usc.edu
Sent: Mon, 9 Oct 2006 11:47 PM
Subject: Re: Question about Archaeopteryx's (non) reversed hallux

"Thank you for the feedback!Â
Torsten van der Lubbe"Â
Â
No, thank YOU for helping me understand all this. Your reply wasÂ
almost instantaneous and it cleared everything up for me.Â
Â
I still have one more question though. Is a retroverted hallux a traitÂ
that's shared in all theropoda or only dromaeosaurs?Â


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