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Re: Two Nose Horns? Re: Yahoo! News Story - Utah scientists find new dinosaur fossil - Yahoo! News



Ahh.

The news article sited below is quoted "The protruding fossil turned out to be most of the skull of a ceratopsid, a smaller and older relative of Triceratops." Centrosaurinae and Chasmosaurinae are two clads of the ceratopsid clads. I know that Chasmosaurs are known at least as far south as Texas in the El Picacho Formation (Maastrichtian) of West Texas. I'm not sure about Centrosaurs proper. Still sounds like typical reporting. Have fun at the SVP party, Ehh!

It is snowing here on the Hell Creek Fm as I type this and my field season is officially over. That is, until Indian summer kicks in:-)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061020/ap_on_sc/dinosaur_find

Frank (Rooster) Bliss
MS Biostratigraphy
Weston, Wyoming
www.cattleranch.org


On Oct 20, 2006, at 8:36 PM, Brad McFeeters wrote:

From: "franklin e. bliss" <frank@blissnet.com>
Reply-To: frank@blissnet.com
To: "Richard W. Travsky" <rtravsky@uwyo.edu>, dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Two Nose Horns? Re: Yahoo! News Story - Utah scientists find new dinosaur fossil - Yahoo! News
Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2006 19:59:57 -0600


To quote the story, "The Utah Geological Survey said the fossil is unique for having two nose horns. It also is the first of this group of dinosaurs to have been found south of Montana." Apparently, the Wyoming Lance Formation and the Texan Big Bend Aguja Formation Ceratopsian specimens don't count. Typically inaccurate reporting but I wonder if someone at the UGS gave them that info.
Frank (Rooster) Bliss
MS Biostratigraphy
Weston, Wyoming
www.cattleranch.org

The group of dinosaurs they are referring to is Centrosaurinae, not Ceratopsia. I saw Kirkland's talk on it at SVP this morning.


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