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Rv: noasaurus reconstruction



Hola Luis,
besides the graphic material that I've sent you, the
Gabriel Lio's reconstruction that is posted as
Velocisaurus at: 
http://dino.lm.com/images/display.php?id=1507

I have two additional things that I'm attaching you as
text here.

The 2003 one was presented in Argentina. We though at
that moment that velocisaurids and noasaurids differ
in the ungual claw.

By 2006 we believe that the claw is from the manus,
but if this last thing is wrong, the 2003 idea is
perhaps valid:

Annual Meeting of Communications of the Asociacion
Paleontologica Argentina, Nov 27th ? 29th, 2003, page
1

Velocisaurids in South America and Madagascar

F. AGNOLÍN, F. NOVAS and S. APESTEGUÍA

The family Velocisauridae was created by Bonaparte to
include the bizarre Velocisaurus unicus Bonaparte,
from the Santonian Bajo de La Carpa Formation, early
recognized as an indeterminate ceratosaurian.
Velocisaurus can be included within Abelisauroidea for
having the ginglimoid of the third metatarsal very
low, a strongly irregular distal trochleae of fourth
metatarsal, with the external condyle reduced and the
internal one distally projected, the second metatarsal
with a strongly compressed area placed proximal to the
distal trochleae, and the characteristic pedal ungueal
structure described by Novas and Bandyopadhyay.
Recently, the small-bodied abelisauroid Masiakasaurus
knopfleri Sampson, Carrano & Forster, was discovered
in Maastrichtian outcrops of Madagascar. Velocisaurus
and Masiakasaurus share slender metatarsals II and IV,
and very gracile and non-raptorial pedal phalanges
with a long dorsal process. These features, which
distinguish them from other abelisauroids, prompts the
inclusion of the latter within Velocisauridae.
Additionally, a reduced and thin 2nd metatarsal,
suggest close relationships with the noasaurid
Noasaurus leali Bonaparte y Powell. However,
noasaurids differ from velocisaurids in having a
specialized raptorial ungueal structure. The
Velocisauridae and the Noasauridae form a monophyletic
clade of small-bodied abelisauroids that would also
include forms from the Cenomanian of Egypt and Aptian
of Brazil. The extremely symmetrical pes of the
abelisauroids, with a wide third metatarsal and
strongly compressed lateral metatarsals, resemble
running birds (e.g. Rhea), suggesting cursorial
capabilities. The recognition of velocisaurid
abelisauroids both in Patagonia and Madagascar adds a
new major component to the Gondwanan Late Cretaceous
fauna, increasing their diversity and thus suggesting
an endemic origin for the Abelisauroidea. 

Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ?B. Rivadavia?,
Av. Ángel Gallardo 470, (1405) Buenos Aires,
Argentina. fedeagnolin@yahoo.com.ar;
fernovas@yahoo.com.ar; paleoninja@yahoo.com.ar  

THE END OF A MYTH: THE MYSTERIOUS UNGUAL CLAW OF
<i>NOASAURUS LEALI</i>
APESTEGUÍA, Sebastián; AGNOLIN, Federico L., and
CHIARELLI, Pablo, Museo Argentino de Ciencias
Naturales ?B. Rivadavia?, Av. Ángel Gallardo 470,
(1405) Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

One of the most striking aspects of the abelisaur
anatomy is the claimed presence of the raptorial
second toe ungual claw reported for the noasaurid
<i>Noasaurus leali</i>, adaptation that  resembles
dromaeosaurids. The re-study of the putative
?raptorial claw? of <i>Noasaurus</i> permitted to
recognize the following features: Ungual claw with a
strong lateral compression and abnormally curved in
lateral view. The articular medial keel is strongly
developed as well as the proximo-ventral process. The
lateral sulci are symmetrical. These features strongly
suggest that this claw is from the manus, and that
<i>Noasaurus</i> bore sharp and well developed
prehensile manual claws. Furthermore, the absence of a
dicotomized lateral sulcus and the lateral bump,
rather than autapomorphic features, mostly support the
manual nature of the claws. The observed symmetry in
the proximal articular facets suggest its pertaining
to a non-lateral digit, perhaps the second one. A
second undescribed claw bear the same features and
size, except for the, perhaps pathological, absence of
the lateral sulcus. As a <i>Noasaurus</i> unique
feature, both sides of the claws are sub-parallel in
dorsal view. Abelisauroid claws were described from
pedes material. The <i>Noasaurus</i> pedes are
unknown, but as suggested by their closely related
velocisaurines (e.g. <i>Velocisaurus, Masiakasaurus,
Santanaraptor</i>), were probably non-raptorial, but
cursorial. The presence of a deep excavation in the
ventral side of the <i>Noasaurus</i> manual claw as
well as the lack of flexor tubercle show abelisauroid
affinities. The mentioned features suggest that the
claimed ?velocisaurid?- noasaurid lineage show a good
development of the forelimbs whereas the lineage that
drove to <i>Carnotaurus</i> shows the opposite trend. 


All the best. Sebastian

  
 --- Sebastian Apesteguia <sebapesteguia@yahoo.com.ar>
escribió:

> Fecha: Sat, 28 Oct 2006 19:22:35 +0000 (GMT)
> De: Sebastian Apesteguia
> <sebapesteguia@yahoo.com.ar>
> Asunto: noasaurus reconstruction
> A: lmpm1234@verizonmail.com
> 
> Hey Luis,
> Evidentemente estas buscando una reconstruccion
> esqueletaria, pero yo te envio esta reconstruccion
> in
> vivo hecha por mi amigo Gabriel lio, tal vez te
> sirva,
> y ademas algunas cosas presentadas en una reunion de
> comunicaciones en Argentina y otra en SVP. Si bien
> estan asignadas como Velocisaurus, consideramos que
> serian la misma cosa, es decir, Velocisaurus muy
> probablemente es un noasáurido. Saludos. Sebastian
> 
> 
>  --- Luis Perez <lmpm1234@verizonmail.com> escribió:
> 
> > Hi. I'm doing a hypothetical reconstruction of
> > Noasaurus for my 
> > senior project, and I was wondering if anyone knew
> > where I could find 
> > Journals on Noasaurus and Dinosaur Reconstructions
> > in general or even 
> > the "Noasauridae" (Masiakasaurus, Ligabueino,
> > Deltadromeus (is it 
> > really a big Noasaur? What makes a Noasaur a
> > Noasaur?))
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > 
> > Luis Perez
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > --
> > 
> > -- 
> > 
> > Search for products and services at: 
> > http://search.mail.com
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> Lic. Sebastián Apesteguía
> 
> Sección de Paleontología de Vertebrados 
> Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 'B. Rivadavia'
> Av. Ángel Gallardo 470 (1405) Buenos Aires,
> ARGENTINA
> Tel-fax:5411-49826595 i.193, paleoninja@yahoo.com.ar
> 
> Área de Paleontología. Fundación de Historia Natural
> 'Félix de Azara',
> Dto. de Ciencias Naturales y Antropología, CEBBAD,
> Univ.Maimónides, 
> V. Virasoro 732 (1405), Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA
> Tel-fax: 5411-49051100 i. 1228,
> secretaria@fundacionazara.org.ar
> www.fundacionazara.org.ar
> 
> Departamento de Paleontología. Fundación Patagónica
> de Ciencias Naturales, Museo Patagónico de Ciencias
> Naturales,
> General Roca, Río Negro, ARGENTINA
> 
> __________________________________________________
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Lic. Sebastián Apesteguía

Sección de Paleontología de Vertebrados 
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 'B. Rivadavia'
Av. Ángel Gallardo 470 (1405) Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA
Tel-fax:5411-49826595 i.193, paleoninja@yahoo.com.ar

Área de Paleontología. Fundación de Historia Natural 'Félix de Azara',
Dto. de Ciencias Naturales y Antropología, CEBBAD, Univ.Maimónides, 
V. Virasoro 732 (1405), Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA
Tel-fax: 5411-49051100 i. 1228, secretaria@fundacionazara.org.ar 
www.fundacionazara.org.ar

Departamento de Paleontología. Fundación Patagónica de Ciencias Naturales, 
Museo Patagónico de Ciencias Naturales,
General Roca, Río Negro, ARGENTINA

__________________________________________________
Correo Yahoo!
Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis! 
¡Abrí tu cuenta ya! - http://correo.yahoo.com.ar