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Planet of the New Papers



Jerry,

Congratulations on your new therizinosaur!  I would, naturally,
appreciate a PDF when one becomes available.  Thanks.

Jerry D. Harris writes:
 > Hi All -
 > 
 >     More new goodies!  First, I now have a list of the papers that were 
 > published last year in the _Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre 
 > Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno_; I only have two of these as PDFs 
 > (the two with abstracts quoted below).  No new taxa erected that I could 
 > see, though lots of interesting tidbits and lots of track stuff:
 > 
 > 
 > Benton, M.J. 2006. The origin of the dinosaurs; pp. 11-19 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno. Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas de los Infantes, Burgos.
 > 
 > ABSTRACT: he origin of the dinosaurs has long been debated. There are two 
 > aspects, phylogenetic and ecological-evolutionary. Much of the phylogenetic 
 > confusion has been resolved by cladistic analysis of basal archosaurs which 
 > shows that the dinosaurs originated as part of a major clade 
 > Avemetatarsalia/ Ornithodira. Closest relatives of the dinosaurs are small 
 > Mid Triassic bipedal animals such as Marasuchus from Argentina. The basal 
 > avemetatarsalian is Scleromochlus from the Late Triassic of Scotland. The 
 > classic ecological-evolutionary model for the initial radiation of the 
 > dinosaurs had been that they competed gradually through the Triassic with 
 > precursor groups, and eventually prevailed. More detailed study of the 
 > timing of events suggests that the dinosaurs radiated opportunistically in a 
 > two-phase model, with expansion of herbivorous sauropodomorphs fi rst in the 
 > early Norian, and expansion of large theropods and ornithischians in the 
 > Early and Mid Jurassic. Both expansion phases followed extinction events.
 > 
 > Canudo, J.I. 2006. La ambigüedad paleobiogeográfia de los dinosaurios 
 > ibéricos durante el Cretácico Inferior; pp. 21-45 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Martill, D.M., Naish, D., and Earland, S. 2006. Dinosaurs in marine strata: 
 > evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous 
 > vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper 
 > Jurassic) of Great Britain; pp. 47-83 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Pereda Suberbiola, X. 2006. El dinosaurio acorazado Polacanthus del 
 > Cretácico Inferior de Europa y el estatus de los Polacanthidae 
 > (Ankylosauria); pp. 85-104 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas 
 > (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de 
 > Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Fernández-Baldor, F.T. 2006. Restos directos de dinosaurios en Burgos 
 > (Sistema Ibérico): un balance provisional; pp. 105-128 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Weishampel, D.B. 2006. Another look at the dinosaurs of the East Coast of 
 > North America; pp. 129-168 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas 
 > (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de 
 > Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Wilson, J.A. 2006. An overview of titanosaur evolution and phylogeny; pp. 
 > 169-190 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas de 
 > las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su 
 > Entorno.
 > 
 > ABSTRACT: Titanosaurus was named in 1877 for two caudal vertebrae and an 
 > isolated femur from Cretaceous rocks of central India. Titanosauridae was 
 > coined soon afterwards to encompass numerous taxa, despite their often 
 > tenuous associations and limited morphological overlap. Long recognized as 
 > wastebasket taxa, "Titanosaurus indicus", "Titanosauridae" and coordinated 
 > rank-taxa are now considered invalid, but the unranked taxon Titanosauria 
 > remains valid. Titanosauria currentles includes 40+ species and fi rst 
 > appeared during the Middle Jurassic in the form of "wide-gauge" trackways. 
 > Titanosaur body fossils do not appear until the Late Jurassic, but they are 
 > inferred to have occupied nearly all continental landmasses during the Early 
 > Cretaceous. Titanosaurs are the predominant or exclusive sauropods during 
 > the Late Cretaceous and represent a key clade for investigation of 
 > survivorship patterns and the effects of major tectonic rearrangements on 
 > dinosaur evolution. Titanosauria includes several large-bodied species 
 > (e.g., Antarctosaurus giganteus, Argyrosaurus superbus, Argentinosaurus 
 > huinculensis), as well as species that are diminutive by sauropod standards 
 > (e.g., Saltasaurus loricatus, Neuquensaurus australis).
 > Evaluation of previous phylogenetic analyses of Titanosauria provides 
 > insight into the structure of the character data thus far generated and a 
 > starting point for future studies. Where comparable, analyses agree on 
 > several topological points, including (1) the basal position of Andesaurus 
 > and Malawisaurus and (2) the derived position of Saltasaurus, Neuquensaurus, 
 > Opisthocoelicaudia, and Alamosaurus. This investigation identifi es several 
 > stable titanosaur nodes and a core of character data for future analysis. 
 > However, many titanosaur species have yet to be included in a phylogenetic 
 > analysis. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of Titanosauria will require 
 > incorporating these taxa as well as new character data. Resolution of 
 > titanosaur interrelationships will spur investigation into Mesozoic 
 > paleobiogeography, changes in body size distribution through time, 
 > wide-gauge limb posture and its biomechanical signifi cance, and patterns in 
 > herbivorous apomorphies of Cretaceous dinosaurs. These and other avenues 
 > will be explored in future research.
 > 
 > 
 > Arcos, A., Sanz, E., Pascual, C., Uriel, S., Latorre, P., and Hernández, N. 
 > 2006. Las deformaciones producidas en los sedimentos por el paso de grandes 
 > dinosaurios: el caso del yacimiento de Saurópodos de Miraflores I, Fuentes 
 > de Magaña (Soria, España); pp. 193-222 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Bravo, A.M., Huerta, P., Izqueirdo Montero, L.A., Montero Huerta, D., 
 > Martínez Pérez, G., Fernández-Baldor, F.T., and Urién Montero, V. 2006. Un 
 > nuevo yacimiento de cáscaras de huevo de dinosaurio de la provincia de 
 > Burgos, España (Maastrichtiense, Fm. Santibañez del Val); pp. 223-234 in 
 > Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III 
 > Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Hernández, N., Pérez-Lorente, F., and Requeta, E. 2006. La Pellejera. 
 > Ejemplo de nuevos yacimientos icníticos en Cameros (La Rioja-Soria, España); 
 > pp. 235-252 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas 
 > de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su 
 > Entorno.
 > 
 > Hernández Medrano, N., Arribas, C.P., Latorre Macarrón, P., and Sanz Pérez, 
 > E. 2006. Huellas de terópodos y pterosaurios en Valdegén I (Villar del Río, 
 > Soria, España); pp. 253-271 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de 
 > Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología 
 > de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Latorre Macarrón, P., Arribas, C.P., Sanz Pérez, E., and Hernández Medrano, 
 > N. 2006. El yacimiento con huellas de saurópodos de Miraflores I, Fuentes de 
 > Magaña (Soria, España); pp. 273-296 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico 
 > de Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre 
 > Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Cuadrado, J.M. 2006. Posibles huellas de saurópodo del Sinemuriense de 
 > Talveila (Soria, España); pp. 297-311 in Colectivo 
 > Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas  (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas 
 > Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Fernández-Baldor, F.T., Izquierdo Montero, L.A., Huerta, P., Montero Huerta, 
 > D., Pérez Martínez, G., and Urién Montero, V. 2006. El yacimiento de icnitas 
 > de dinsoaurios de Costalomo (Salas de los Infantes, Burgos, España): nuevos 
 > datos; pp. 313-347 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), 
 > Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios 
 > y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Fernández-Baldor, F.T., Izquierdo Montero, L.A., Contreras Izquierdo, R., 
 > Huerta, P., Montero Huerta, D., Pérez Martínez, G., and Urién Montero, V. 
 > 2006. Un dinosaurio 'iguanodóntido' del Cretácico Inferior de Burgos 
 > (España); pp. 349-363 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas 
 > (ed.), Actas de las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de 
 > Dinosaurios y su Entorno.
 > 
 > Vila, B., Gaete, R., Galobart, À., Oms, O., Peralba, J., and Escuer, J. 
 > 2006. Nuevos hallazgos de dinosaurios y otros tetrápodos continentales en 
 > los Pirineos sur-centrales y orientales: resultados preliminares; pp. 
 > 365-378 in Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico de Salas (ed.), Actas de 
 > las III Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su 
 > Entorno.
 > 
 > 
 > The Benton paper is available at 
 > http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/Benton/reprints/2006Salas.pdf; the Wilson paper 
 > at 
 > http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wilsonja/JAW/Publications_files/Wilson2006b.pdf.
 > 
 > 
 > 
 > Next, Mike already chastized my lapsus calami in not spotting 
 > _Paluxysaurus_, but there's a Jurassic mammal paper in the same ish of PE:
 > 
 > Prasad, G.V.R., and Manhas, B.K. 2007. A new docodont mammal from the 
 > Jurassic Kota Formation of India. Palaeontologica Electronica 10(2):7A1-11.
 > 
 > ABSTRACT: The late Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Kota Formation of 
 > peninsular India has previously yielded "symmetrodontan" and eutriconodontan 
 > mammals. Bulk screenwashing of the clays and mudstones interbedded with the 
 > limestone band representing the Upper Member of the Kota Formation and 
 > exposed along a stream cutting 150 m west of Paikasigudem village, Adilabad 
 > District, Andhra Pradesh, India, produced an isolated mammalian upper 
 > premolar. The premolar with its asymmetrical occlusal outline, two labial 
 > cusps, pinching of crown lingual to the labial cusps, and a wide talon basin 
 > is very similar to the upper premolars of docodont mammals. Detailed 
 > comparisons with the upper dentition of various known docodont taxa showed 
 > that the new specimen from India has premolar morphology comparable to a 
 > Haldanodon pattern, and here it is assigned to Gondtherium dattai gen. et 
 > sp. nov. (Docodontidae). This represents the first discovery of docodont 
 > mammals from the Southern Hemisphere and suggests a wide geographic 
 > distribution for this group of mammals.
 > 
 > 
 > Particularly interesting because it calls the Kota Formation "Middle 
 > Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous"...?!?  Cited as based on palynological data from 
 > 2001; that reference, if anyone wants it, is:
 > 
 > Vijaya, and Prasad, G.V.R. 2001. Age of the Kota Formation, 
 > Pranhita-Godavari Valley, India: a palynological approach. Journal of the 
 > Palaeontological Society of India 46:77-93.
 > 
 > Granted, there's a common author between the two, but I'm not aware of 
 > anyone else using this late age for the unit, and more recent stuff still 
 > calls it Lower Jurassic, e.g.:
 > 
 > Bandyopadhyay, S., and Sengupta, D.P. 2006. Vertebrate faunal turnover 
 > during the Triassic-Jurassic transition: an Indian scenario; pp. 77-85 in 
 > Harris, J.D., Lucas, S.G., Spielmann, J.A., Lockley, M.G., Milner, A.R.C., 
 > and Kirkland, J.I. (eds.), The Triassic-Jurassic Terrestrial Transition. New 
 > Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 37.
 > 
 > 
 > 
 > Lastly, a couple of brand-spankin' new dinosaurs, one therizinosaur, one 
 > hadrosaur:
 > 
 > Li, D., Peng, C., You, H., Lamanna, M.C., Harris, J.D., Lacovata, K.J., and 
 > Zhang, J. 2007. A large therizinosauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the 
 > Early Cretaceous of northwestern China. Acta Geologica Sinica (English 
 > Edition) 81(4):539-549.
 > 
 > ABSTRACT: We herein describe an associated partial postcranial skeleton of a 
 > theropod dinosaur discovered in the Lower Cretaceous Xinminpu Group of the 
 > Yujingzi Basin, in the Jiuquan area of Gansu Province, northwestern China. 
 > Features of its humerus, such as strongly expanded proximal and distal ends, 
 > a well developed medial tuberosity, distal condyles expressed on the humeral 
 > cranial surface, and a hypertrophied entepicondyle, definitively establish 
 > the therizinosauroid affinities of the specimen. It differs from other 
 > therizinosauroids in having a shallow, poorly demarcated glenoid fossa with 
 > a prominent rounded and striated tumescence on the dorsomedial surface of 
 > its scapular portion, and a pubis with a strongly concave cranial margin. It 
 > represents a new taxon, Suzhousaurus megatherioides gen. et sp. nov. 
 > Cladistic analysis recovers Suzhousaurus as the sister taxon of Nothronychus 
 > mckinleyi from the mid-Cretaceous of western North America; together, they 
 > are basal members of the Therizinosauroidea, more derived than the Early 
 > Cretaceous Falcarius and Beipiaosaurus but less derived than Alxasaurus and 
 > the Therizinosauridae. Along with "Nanshiungosaurus" bohlini from possibly 
 > coeval beds in the Mazongshan area of northern-most Gansu, Suzhousaurus 
 > represents one of the largest-known Early Cretaceous therizinosauroids, 
 > demonstrating that this clade attained considerable body size early in its 
 > evolutionary history.
 > 
 > 
 > 
 > Mo, J., Zhao, Z., Wang, W., and Xu, X. 2007. The first hadrosaurid dinosaur 
 > from southern China. Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition) 81(4):550-554.
 > 
 > ABSTRACT: A new hadrosaurid dinosaur, Nanningosaurus dashiensis gen. et sp. 
 > nov., is described based on an incomplete skeleton from the Late Cretaceous 
 > red beds of the Nalong Basin, Guangxi, southern China. Diagnostic features 
 > for the new taxon include the presence of a tall and sharply peaked dorsal 
 > process of the maxilla with reduced process of the jugal and a distinct 
 > lacrimal facet, gracile humerus with low, rounded deltopectoral crest, 
 > mandibular condyle of the quadrate transversly broad with reduced 
 > paraquadrate notch, dentary tooth with sinuous median carina and subsidiary 
 > ridge, relatively few tooth positions, ischial shaft straight along most of 
 > its distance, but to curve dorsally and expand at the distal end before the 
 > ischial foot begins. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that Nanningosaurus 
 > dashiensis is a basal member of Lambeosaurinae.
 > 
 > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 > Jerry D. Harris
 > Director of Paleontology
 > Dixie State College
 > Science Building
 > 225 South 700 East
 > St. George, UT  84770   USA
 > Phone: (435) 652-7758
 > Fax: (435) 656-4022
 > E-mail: jharris@dixie.edu
 >  and     dinogami@gmail.com
 > http://cactus.dixie.edu/jharris/
 > 
 > STORIES IN SIX WORDS OR LESS:
 > 
 > "Machine. Unexpectedly, I'd invented
 > a time"
 >                -- Alan Moore
 > 
 > "Easy. Just touch the match to"
 >                -- Ursula K. Le Guin
 > 
 > "Batman Sues Batsignal: Demands
 > Trademark Royalties."
 >                -- Cory Doctorow 
 > 
 > 
 >