[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Fw: PalAss Meeting



Even though this e-mail was in plain text and had line breaks, it still got the "truncated" message attached, so some people -- and the archives -- only display the "truncated" message. Because I have replied to it, I've been asked to repost this from my trusty Outlook Express.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tommy Tyrberg" <tommy.tyrberg@norrkoping.mail.telia.com>
To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, December 18, 2007 11:57 PM
Subject: PalAss Meeting

Just back from the Palaeontological Association annual meeting which was
in Uppsala this year. Not too much about dinosaurs, but there was a few
interesting things.

A new large phylogenetic study of Archosauria by Benton & Brusette with
a number of new characters used. Nothing surprising among the
Avemetatarsalia, but some interesting things among the Crurotarsi.
Phytosaurs are basal, Aetosaurs are the sister-group of Crocodilians and
the Rausuchia are paraphyletic. Most stay on their own branch but some,
including Poposaurus group with Ornithosuchia.

Two studies of heterodontosaurs agree that they were not sexually
dimorphic and that the tusks were already present in juveniles.
Morphology, wear and the weakness of the lower jaw suggests that the
teeth were used for straight biting, but not tearing or slashing. The
conclusion was that the tusks were probably not used for intra-species
fighting or display, nor for defence, but that heterodontosaurs were
omnivores living in semi-arid habitat and used the teeth to kill
smallish prey.

Vivi Vajda presented a brand-new study of pollen from the Mahaounga
stream dinosaur locality (it was so new she hadn't even had time to draw
a pollen diagram). The upshot is that Mahaouanga stream is latest
Campanian. Strangely there was a lot of angiosperms (52%, including
among others Nothofagus and Proteaceae) while younger Maastrichtian
pollen floras from New Zealand are dominated by Podocarps.

Tommy Tyrberg