[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Almost New Papers



Hi All -

   Just got hold of a few more '06 papers:

Ye, Y., 2006, The sauropod fossils from the Zigong, Sichuan, China, in Dong, W., and Wang, Y., eds., Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Vertebrate Paleontology: Beijing, China Ocean Press, p. 1-8.

-- reviews mostly existing stuff, but also reports _Mamenchisaurus_ skin impressions.

Jiang, S., 2006, The stegosaur fossils in Sichuan Basin, in Dong, W., and Wang, Y., eds., Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Vertebrate Paleontology: Beijing, China Ocean Press, p. 9-16.

-- also a review, but has a not bad photo of _Gigantspinosaurus_ in the ground, complete with ginormous, bent parascapular spines; the specimen looks like it lacks a tail, and while some neck is visible, I am not certain about a skull (it looks vaguely there, or to have been removed before the photo was taken -- there's a large patch of irregularities the same tint as the matrix at the end of the neck, and that area is pedestaled, as is the rest of the specimen...); it also has some skin impressions.

Zhang, X., Li, G., Lin, J., and Ling, Q., 2006, Stratum model of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary of Datang, Nanxiong Basin, Guangdong, China, in Dong, W., and Wang, Y., eds., Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Vertebrate Paleontology: Beijing, China Ocean Press, p. 17-32.

-- mostly a biostratigraphic report trying to pinpoint the K/Pg boundary in this area, but depends heavily on dinosaur eggs, as well as ostracodes.

   I also got:

Lü, J., Ji, S., Yuan, C., and Ji, Q., 2006, Pterosaurs from China: Beijing, Geological Publishing House, 147 p.

-- this is also largely a review; no new species are described (though this is the first time I've seen a picture of _Yixianopterus_, which is described in the book from the 2005 Heyuan International Dionsaur Symposium), although they erect the new "family" Boreopteridae within the Ornithocheiroidea, to which they ascribe _Boreopterus_ and _Feilongus_. There's also a cladistic analysis of all these taxa plus lots of other pterosaurs -- the goal seems to have been to simply position the Chinese pterosaurs, not revamp pterosaur phylogeny as a whole. There are also some SEM shots of _Beipiaopterus_ soft tissue, one CT cross section of _Dsungaripterus_, and some info on Chinese pterosaur tracks and the Jehol eggs. The book is entirely in Chinese except for the list of characters used in the analysis and an appendix listing the Chinese pterosaurs and their higher-group affiliations. Interestingly, in this list (and possibly elsewhere in the text), they note that _Longchengpterus_ and _Istiodactylus sinensis_ are junior synonyms of _Nurhachius_.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jerry D. Harris
Director of Paleontology
Dixie State College
Science Building
225 South 700 East
St. George, UT  84770   USA
Phone: (435) 652-7758
Fax: (435) 656-4022
E-mail: jharris@dixie.edu
and     dinogami@gmail.com
http://cactus.dixie.edu/jharris/

"Trying to estimate the divergence times
of fungal, algal or prokaryotic groups on
the basis of a partial reptilian fossil and
protein sequences from mice and humans
is like trying to decipher Demotic Egyptian with
the help of an odometer and the Oxford
English Dictionary."
-- D. Graur & W. Martin (_Trends
in Genetics_ 20[2], 2004)