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Re: New bird /pterosaur flight paper in PLoS ONE



I WAS drawing a parallel between pterosaurs and similarly sized and configured sailplanes. It just doesn't have anything much to do with thermal lift, since neither those sailplanes nor pterosaurs are dependent upon thermal lift. Any paper that assumes that they are is deeply flawed. Quetzalcoatlus was as capable as an albatross -- Quetz's wings were more capable, accomodating the penalty of the long neck and large head. I've not looked in depth at Hatzegopteryx, but would expect similar performance from it.
JimC


----- Original Message ----- From: "don ohmes" <d_ohmes@yahoo.com>
To: "jrc" <jrccea@bellsouth.net>
Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: New bird /pterosaur flight paper in PLoS ONE




Actually, I jumped to the conclusion that you were drawing a parallel between sailplanes and pterosaurs relative to the central point of the paper under discussion. So sorry...



--- On Wed, 4/29/09, jrc <jrccea@bellsouth.net> wrote:

From: jrc <jrccea@bellsouth.net>
Subject: Re: New bird /pterosaur flight paper in PLoS ONE
To: d_ohmes@yahoo.com
Cc: dinosaur@usc.edu
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 6:51 PM
P.S.  Note that I said nothing below that implied that those
traveling sailplanes were using thermal lift.  For
traveling, cloud streets and microlift are far more
effective.  I believe you may have jumped to a conclusion
that sailplanes only fly by making use of thermal lift.
JimC
----- Original Message ----- From: "don ohmes"
<d_ohmes@yahoo.com>
To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:03 PM
Subject: Re: New bird /pterosaur flight paper in PLoS ONE


> > > --- On Wed, 4/29/09, jrc <jrccea@bellsouth.net> wrote: > >> Note that sailplanes with wingspans, wing areas, aspect >> ratios, and gross weights similar to those of the largest >> pterosaurs are repeatedly capable of soaring non-stop for >> hundreds of kilometers on an average day, and they don't >> have the ability to flap at all. > > Actually, they cover that -- "The present study does not deny the possibility that they (the large pterosaurs) might rely on warmed rising air of thermals..." > > Don > > >