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RE: Bone -- Internal Modelling Relative to Attitude




Dr. Bäker, this is mostly in line with what I wanted to know, or at least a 
further line to pursue information. I am looking for information regarding bone 
tissues outside of the long bones, that do not undergo typical loading regimes 
as in those of the limbs, but may still be loaded and thus would still be 
relevant to the orientation of the fibers surrounding the osteons. So this is 
particularly helpful, and I thank you. Almost certainly, this is relevant in 
cases were bone attitude (position in relation to the animal or ground) and 
orientation such as the scapula or the vertabrae can indicate the average of 
the positions the bone is regularly subjected to in life. It would also be 
interesting to see if the loading in vertebrae is important enough that it 
might allow us to subject primary anatomical data to such bones to assess 
attitude of organ systems, such as the spinal column.

Cheers,

Jaime A. Headden

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn
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different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
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Backs)





----------------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2009 09:16:08 +0200
> From: martin.baeker@tu-bs.de
> To: qi_leong@hotmail.com
> CC: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Bone -- Internal Modelling Relative to Attitude
>
> Hi Jaime,
>
> I'm not sure if I understand correctly what you mean by attitude - if
> you mean whether the bone microstructure depends on the loading on the
> bone (which is in itself influenced by how the bone is held) then the
> answer should be yes, at least in some cases. For example, in tensile
> regions the collagen fibres in the osteons are more strongly oriented
> in the loading direction; in compressive regions, they have a tendency
> to be oriented in circumferential direction of the osteon. Mineral
> content also changes depending on the loading.
>
> This is discussed in Martin, Burr, Shakley, "Skeletal tissue
> mechanics" and partly also in JD Curreys book "Bones". If you need
> more details, tell me.
>
> Sorry if this was not what you were asking,
>
> Martin.
>
>>
>> I have a question pursuing research, and pardon if what I am asking should 
>> be obviously known. I am fairly certain I saw a reference to longbone 
>> modelling that indicated infrastructure related to that bone's habitual 
>> attitude, but I am not familiar with it. In furtherance of my edification, I 
>> am therefore wondering if anyone is aware of research and publications that 
>> describe the relationship of the infrastructure of bone (from the medullary 
>> cavity to the periosteum, and from the diaphysis to the epiphyses) to its 
>> habitual attitude? Does the relative position or attitude actually have any 
>> bearing on the infrastructure at all?
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Jaime A. Headden
>>
>> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
>>
>>
>> "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn
>> from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent
>> disinclination to do so." --- Douglas Adams (Last Chance to See)
>>
>>
>> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
>> different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
>> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
>> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
>> Backs)
>>
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Windows Live™: Keep your life in sync.
>> http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_BR_sync:082009
>>
>
> Priv.-Doz. Dr. Martin Bäker
> Institut für Werkstoffe
> Technische Universität Braunschweig
> Langer Kamp 8
> 38106 Braunschweig
> Germany
> Tel.: 00-49-531-391-3073
> Fax 00-49-531-391-3058
> e-mail 

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