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Re: Venom in Sinornithosaurus



To your credit, most people, especially in the pet trade, would say most 
colubrids are not venomous. As far as I know corns aren't venomous at all, 
anyway. But the venom that Thamnophis species produce is literally chewed into 
prey, they really have to gnaw on you to get it in, and even then only a 
handful of people experience a reaction to it. I would think a neurotoxin that 
mild wouldn't do anything much to kill prey, but serve better to disable it or 
reduce struggling while being swallowed.

Michelle Pinsdorf
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

--- On Thu, 12/24/09, Erik Boehm <erikboehm07@yahoo.com> wrote:

> From: Erik Boehm <erikboehm07@yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: Venom in Sinornithosaurus
> To: drakeducaine@yahoo.com
> Date: Thursday, December 24, 2009, 5:37 PM
> Hmm, and I had corn snakes as
> pets.... I didn't know any snakes, related to the corn
> snakes one might keep as a pet, were venomous
> 
> --- On Thu, 12/24/09, Michelle Pinsdorf <drakeducaine@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> 
> > From: Michelle Pinsdorf <drakeducaine@yahoo.com>
> > Subject: Re: Venom in Sinornithosaurus
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Date: Thursday, December 24, 2009, 10:51 AM
> > 
> > --- On Thu, 12/24/09, Erik Boehm <erikboehm07@yahoo.com>
> > wrote:
> > 
> > > Suppose all snakes go extinct except for the non
> > venomous
> > > Corn Snake family.
> > > Do you then conclude despite finding fossils
> with
> > fangs,
> > > that the snakes were non-poisonous, as there must
> be
> > some
> > > other function for the fangs?
> > ...
> > > Yes, I know - if only corn snakes were around,
> there
> > would
> > > be no evidence in extant animals for venom, and
> we
> > shouldn't
> > > assume earlier snakes had venom - fine.
> > 
> > Actually, some species within the 'Corn Snake family'
> > (Colubridae) are rear-fanged, and garter snakes have a
> very
> > mild neurotoxin in their saliva produced by a gland in
> their
> > gums. Garter snakes have no obvious means for
> delivering
> > venom (no venom sac, no grooved teeth, no fangs)
> except for
>
ed in soft tissue. I guess this only
> > complicates your analogy, as there are many animals
> that
> > secrete toxins of one form or another, be it for prey
> > capture or to avoid becoming prey, that show no
> outward
> > osteological clues of that feature. That's what I get
> for
> > keeping garters as pets!
> > 
> > Michelle Pinsdorf
> > South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
> > 
> > 
> >       
> > 
> 
> 
> 
>