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Re: Limusaurus Inextricabilis



Thank you for the data. Regarding lethality of splints of bone,
according to Wings (2007), ostriches can eat and destroy glass in
their stomach without suffering from cuts. In any case, I suppose
hyaenas and other bone-crackers may face similar problems.

2009/6/21 Tim Williams <tijawi@yahoo.com>:
>
> Augusto Haro wrote:
>
>
>> Xenarthran anteaters have also a muscular stomach which is
>> said to
>> crush ants (according to Grassé's Traité de Zoologie). I
>> do not know
>> if there are gastroliths in anteaters,
>
>
> The aardwolf (_Proteles cristatus_) is an insect-eating mammal (carnivoran), 
> and it apparently has gastroliths of some variety (Anderson et al., 1992; J. 
> Zool. 228: 423-434).  The aardwolf has been held up in support of 
> insectivorous habits in _Caudipteryx_, which also has gastroliths.  This 
> analogy appeared in a _New Scientist_ article (28 August, 1998) by Graham 
> Taylor on the "Pouncing Proavis" model for the origin of avian flight.
>
>
> In the same _New Scientist_ article, Taylor states: "In fact, gastroliths 
> would be potentially lethal for a meat-eating animal, since their grinding 
> action can splinter a bone into a thousand stomach-lacerating pieces".  I've 
> not seen this mentioned elsewhere, and there is no reference cited by Taylor 
> in support of this.
>
>
> Cheers
>
> Tim
>
>
>
>
>