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Re: Dragon's Paradise Lost - re-planting KD's in Oz



> Bring 'em on. There's vast amounts of roadkill that goes to waste all across
> northern Australia, but if they want fresh meat they can live on water
> buffalo, gaur and pigs at first, we'll wean them onto a native diet if they
> behave themselves.

Would a Sarcophilus mess with these much larger beasts? Accepting they
are able to outrun them. I suppose they would prey upon the smaller
fauna.

> And yes, I fully understand that lizards may bite people. But we already
> have large goannas in Australia, and they never kill ANYONE. We have an
> international reputation to maintain, and our lizards are simply NOT DEADLY
> ENOUGH!

You are right. With the reasoning that they can kill people, we should
kill all tigers, lions, bears, jaguars and large crocodiles. And
expect for (probably suffering) the ecological consequences of such
desregulation of the prey populations.

I think something which can help conservation is this: all our
domestic animals, which come mostly from Eurasia and Africa generally
outcompete native faunas in Australia and South America. I think this
is so because we help their reproduction, so, even if they are not
very well adapted, these species would never extinguish because we are
assuring their presence, and their eventual escape into feral state.

Now, what if we just take some animals in danger of extinction and
raise them as pets (more useful for small or non-carnivorous critters)
instead of cats and dogs? In such a case, their reproduction would be
assured by our species, and when they get into the feral condition,
they would be assured in a similar way as are the very destructive
common domestic animals such as dogs, cats and pigs. We should also
prefer also using native animals as food sources (this way, escape
into feral condition would be something good for conservation), and
most materials, always in a sustainable way, of course.