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Re: Ostrich Wings Explain Mystery of Flightless Dinosaurs



Maybe so, but tail reduction and tail loss are not the same thing. Even 
_Archaeopteryx_ had a tail of appreciable length (at least equal to body 
length). Even reduced, the tail would still provide an effective counterbalance.

Jason


--- On Thu, 7/1/10, dinoboygraphics@aol.com <dinoboygraphics@aol.com> wrote:

> From: dinoboygraphics@aol.com <dinoboygraphics@aol.com>
> Subject: Re: Ostrich Wings Explain Mystery of Flightless Dinosaurs
> To: pristichampsus@yahoo.com, dinosaur@usc.edu
> Date: Thursday, July 1, 2010, 5:39 PM
> Actually, viewed phylogenetically
> those lineages all show tail reduction (in either mass it
> length...but rarely both) relative to the the plesiomorphic
> condition.
> 
> -Scott
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jura <pristichampsus@yahoo.com>
> Sender: owner-DINOSAUR@usc.edu
> Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 12:02:39 
> To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> Reply-To: pristichampsus@yahoo.com
> Subject: Re: Ostrich Wings Explain Mystery of Flightless
> Dinosaurs
> 
> The finding is neat, and I'm all for comparison with extant
> animals, but I wonder how pertinent it would actually be to
> dinosaurs. The paper seems to talk about ostriches using
> their wings for balance during agile maneuvers, but this is
> for a tailless animal. The theropods that gave rise to
> birds, all had nice long tails to do much of the
> counterbalance work. I'm just wondering if the results
> Schaller found might more accurately reflect an exaptation
> by ratites to a secondarily flightless existence, rather
> than a plesiomorphic behaviour. 
> 
> Perhaps Scott covered this in his paper. I haven't had a
> chance to read it, as JVP is being finicky about their
> archives (i.e. supplement to No.3 for vol. 20 doesn't show
> up on the site).
> 
> Jason
> --- On Thu, 7/1/10, dinoboygraphics@aol.com
> <dinoboygraphics@aol.com>
> wrote:
> 
> > From: dinoboygraphics@aol.com
> <dinoboygraphics@aol.com>
> > Subject: Re: Ostrich Wings Explain Mystery of
> Flightless Dinosaurs
> > To: dinosaur@usc.e
 Thursday, July 1, 2010, 2:17 PM
> > Gee, now where have I heard that idea
> > before?  Oh yeah:
> > 
> > Hartman, Scott. 2000. Primary and caudal feathers as
> > locomotory adaptations in maniraptoran theropods.
> Journal of
> > Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 20, Supplement to No. 3.
> pp.
> > 47A.
> > 
> > Hartman, Scott. 2005. Estimating Ancestral Habitat
> and
> > Selective Pressures Leading to the Origin of Avian
> > Flight. Abstract volume of the II Latin American
> Congress
> > of Vertebrate Paleontology.
> > 
> > Awesome to see corroborating data from extant
> > animals.  And it's my fault of course for not having
> a
> > paper in print yet, but there were a couple of extra
> steps
> > that I had to look into along the way.  Soon...
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Scott Hartman
> > Scientific Advisor/Technical Illustrator
> > (307) 921-9750
> > www.skeletaldrawing.com
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker@zipcon.net>
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Sent: Thu, Jul 1, 2010 1:06 pm
> > Subject: Ostrich Wings Explain Mystery of Flightless
> > Dinosaurs
> > 
> > 
> > HI:FYI:http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/2010

> ric
> > hwingsexplainmysteryofflightlessdinosaurs-- Ian
> > PaulsenBainbridge Island, WA, USA" Which just goes to
> show
> > that a  passion for books is extremely unhealthy."
> from
> > Cornelia Funke's "Inkheart".
> >  
> 
> 
>       
>