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Re: Bird reduce their "heating bills" in cold climates



On Sat, Jul 3rd, 2010 at 1:27 PM, GUY LEAHY <xrciseguy@q.com> wrote:

> 
> It may be impossible to tell, since climate gradients were generally less in 
> the Mesozoic, but I
> wonder if polar theropods might show the 
> same trend...
>  
> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100623104428.htm

Qantassaurus is certainly thought to have had a fore-shortened snout (although 
obviously not a 
theropod).

However with non-avian dinosaurs, I'd think the length and thickness of the 
tail would have been 
more important as far as heat loss in a cold climate was concerned. During the 
last Friends of 
Dinosaur Dreaming meeting late last year it was hinted that Leaellynasaura may 
have had a hyper-
long tail (the full-scale drawing held up - with the help of several people - 
had to be seen to be 
believed!). I find it hard however to reconcile possible burrowing behaviour 
with such long tails - 
unless Leaellynasaura had a flexible fluffy tail like that of arctic foxes to 
help it brave cold 
conditions, and burrowing was left to other small ornithopod species like 
Qantassaurus.

-- 
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Dann Pigdon
Spatial Data Analyst               Australian Dinosaurs
Melbourne, Australia               http://home.alphalink.com.au/~dannj
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