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Re: How to cite information in Wikipedia? (for a High School study guide)



<<And in the above case, shouldn't the 1950s paper itself be cited as the source?>>

It is now, but it took a while for that to turn up! Wiki gave me grounds for wanting to get my paws on it, and that took time and some luck.
Cheers
Trevor

----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas R. Holtz, Jr." <tholtz@umd.edu>
To: <ktdykes@arcor.de>
Cc: <dinosaur@usc.edu>; <VRTPALEO@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 10:54 PM
Subject: RE: How to cite information in Wikipedia? (for a High School study guide)


From: owner-DINOSAUR@usc.edu [mailto:owner-DINOSAUR@usc.edu]
On Behalf Of K and T Dykes

<<Agreed: no wiki citations. If the wiki article cites some
other primary source (which most good pages do), go to that
source, verify it, and cite that. If not, it is basically hearsay.>>

However, if that's the best source you have available, and it
perhaps calls into question the possibility of some other
source or other, then cite it.

I'm presently thinking of a small detail of nomenclature for
a Lower Jurassic mammal (or mammaliform).  I had an English
translation for that name from a UK paleontologist of renown,
but I shan't mention who.  It was in one of his books.  That
was my first source and, somehow, I wasn't convinced.  I
checked Wikipedia and found a different translation.
Somewhat later, the original 1950s paper arrived per post.
Wiki was correct and the paleontologist was wrong.  In this
case, I feel obliged to cite Wiki on my webpage.

And in three years, or three weeks, or (sometimes) three hours from now when
someone changes the Wikipedia [or other wiki] article to state something
entirely different, how useful is your citation? Minimally when citing an
online-only source, indicate the date you accessed that information.

And in the above case, shouldn't the 1950s paper itself be cited as the
source?

Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
Email: tholtz@umd.edu Phone: 301-405-4084
Office: Centreville 1216
Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
Fax: 301-314-9661

Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
Fax: 301-314-9843

Mailing Address: Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
Department of Geology
Building 237, Room 1117
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742 USA